4/30/15 E&E Daily INTERIOR: ‘We’re terrified,’ rancher tells lawmakers about Park Service

Kevin Lunny, co-owner of Drakes Bay Oyster Co., described his dispute with the National Park Service in harrowing detail. The rancher and business owner claimed that the agency had undertaken a “taxpayer-funded enterprise of corruption to run a small business out of” Point Reyes, Calif.
“Let me be clear: We did not fail as a business. This was not bad luck,” Lunny said. “Our family experienced the worst of what a motivated federal agency can do to a small business.”
E&E Daily
INTERIOR:
‘We’re terrified,’ rancher tells lawmakers about Park Service
Kevin Bogardus, E&E reporter
Published: Thursday, April 30, 2015
House lawmakers yesterday chewed on the years-long battle over the fate of a former California oyster farm as they delved into the alleged abuse of government-funded science.
Kevin Lunny, co-owner of Drakes Bay Oyster Co., described his dispute with the National Park Service in harrowing detail. The rancher and business owner claimed that the agency had undertaken a “taxpayer-funded enterprise of corruption to run a small business out of” Point Reyes, Calif.
“Let me be clear: We did not fail as a business. This was not bad luck,” Lunny said. “Our family experienced the worst of what a motivated federal agency can do to a small business.”
Lunny was testifying before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. The hearing was called to examine allegations of federal agencies using “politically driven science,” according to the subpanel’s notice.
Under a settlement agreement announced last year with the Interior Department, Lunny had to close down his oyster farm after losing a protracted legal fight over its operation in a potential wilderness area (E&ENews PM, Oct. 6, 2014). The farm had harvested oysters for decades in Drakes Bay. Lunny bought the farm in 2005.
At yesterday’s hearing, Lunny said he was subject to misrepresentations and attacks by the Park Service during his fight to renew his oyster farm lease, which had expired in 2012. He described a federal environmental impact statement on the oyster farm as “weaponized.”
Lunny still operates a ranch in the area and claimed that the Park Service now has been isolating ranchers. Rep. Raúl Labrador (R-Idaho) asked Lunny if there would be “negative consequences” for him from testifying before the subcommittee.
“We’re terrified. Ranchers that are sitting behind me are terrified because we are challenging the Park Service very seriously. They did lie. They did falsify science,” Lunny said.
The Park Service has tried to repair its ties with ranchers in the area after the bitter fight over the oyster farm (Greenwire, June 4, 2014).
The Interior inspector general in 2008 found that a scientist employed by Point Reyes National Seashore misstated data on the environmental impacts of mariculture to hurt the oyster farm (Greenwire, July 23, 2008).
Rep. Jared Huffman (D-Calif.) said he has known Lunny for years and that he is “a good and decent guy.” The congressman noted that the battle over Drakes Bay, which is based in his congressional district, has “strained relationships that we are still working very hard to put back together.”
“Re-litigating these old accusations from a matter that has been closed at a time when this community is really trying to move on is not helpful or productive,” Huffman said.  [the case was never litigated, the Lunny’s asked for an injunction to remain open while a lawsuit could be pursued]
Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas), chairman of the subcommittee, said the hearing was an examination of science manipulated by agencies for their own purposes.
“This will be an honest assessment of how the system has failed,” Gohmert said.
Lawmakers also heard from witnesses on how the Fish and Wildlife Service’s faulty counting of whooping cranes led to drawn-out litigation for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. In addition, the panel heard that recovery efforts in Bastrop County, Texas, from a wildfire were delayed because of protections for the Houston toad, an endangered species.
Democrats sought to pivot the hearing toward discussion of attacks on science, including on those researching climate change.
“In a hearing about politically driven science, climate denial is the ultimate case study,” said Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), ranking member of the House Natural Resources Committee.
At one point, Gohmert responded forcefully to suggestions that the hearing was unfairly going after science.
“The purpose of the hearing was to hear from real people, mammals called human beings that have been harmed by the federal government,” said the subcommittee chairman.
Toward the close of yesterday’s hearing, Gohmert said his subpanel would continue to look into alleged wrongdoing by federal agencies.
“You can expect more hearings to get to the bottom of what our government has been doing to our people,” Gohmert said.

4/29/15 Daily Caller: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE EMPLOYEES LIED TO PUT HISTORIC OYSTER COMPANY OUT OF BUSINESS

CLICK THIS LINK  http://naturalresources.house.gov/calendar/eventsingle.aspx?EventID=398357

AND THEN CLICK ON THE “WATCH THE ARCHIVED HEARING WEBCAST ” LINK ON THAT PAGE.

Oversight Hearing on “Zero Accountability: The Consequences of Politically Driven Science.”

The House Subcommittee on Oversight & Investigations held a hearing yesterday, 4/29/15 at 2 PM and one of the issues they looked at is the misuse of science by the NPS in Drakes Estero.  Kevin Lunny was called to testify as a witness.

 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE EMPLOYEES LIED TO PUT HISTORIC OYSTER COMPANY OUT OF BUSINESS
04-29-2015 5:42 pm – Michael Bastasch – Daily Caller
The National Park Service used falsified data to shut down an 80-year-old oyster company in Point Reyes, Calif, its owner claims.

Drakes Bay Oyster Company operated in Point Reyes for decades until National Park Service officials used falsified data to force Kevin Lunny’s family-run oyster farm to shut down. The experience has left its mark on Lunny: “We Are Terrified,” he told lawmakers during a hearing Thursday.

“Let me be clear, we did not fail as a business,” Lunny said in his prepared testimony. “This was not bad luck. Rather, the Park Service engaged in a taxpayer-funded enterprise of corruption to run our small business out of Point Reyes.”

Lunny made this statement in response to a question by Republican Rep. Raul Labrador asking whether or not Lunny felt like there could be consequences from his testimony against the National Parks Service.

Even Democratic California Rep. Jared Huffman admitted that in the rush to get rid of industry from Point Reyes, government officials and environmentalists “overstated” evidence that Lunny’s farm was harming the environment.

“No one has apologized,” Lunny said.

Drakes Bay Oyster Company is located in Northern California’s Point Reyes National Seashore, where it has been for decades. Point Reyes isn’t your typical national park because it was created to preserve the historic coastline where people have been settled since the Gold Rush. It was never intended to be a major tourist attraction like Yellowstone.

For decades the Park Service had a good relationship with the oyster company, but that all changed in the mid-2000s. All of the sudden, NPS officials started blaming the company for an 80 percent decline in the local harbor seal population. Officials also blamed Lunny’s farm for upsetting the ecological balance of Drakes Estero.

But all of these accusations against Drakes Bay Oyster Company turned out to be completely false. The National Parks Service lacked any scientific data to back up its claims that the company was killing seals and hurting the local environment. In fact, studies done by the U.S. Geological Survey and the California State Health Department showed the Parks Service was completely wrong.

NPS, however, didn’t stop there and kept making false claims against the oyster company.

“The Park Service misrepresented that study,” Lunny said. “They instead attempted to demonstrate harm by substituting data from a sixty-year-old study conducted at the Sea of Japan and attributing it to our farm.”

“For example, in assessing the noise impact of our small outboard motor boats, the Park Service, rather than measuring our boats on our soundscape [as required], instead used the measurements from a seventy-horsepower, 700cc Kawasaki jet ski in New Jersey,” Lunny added.

Lunny appealed to higher ups at the National Park Service for help in the matter and to correct the record on false statements made by the agency, but he got no help from the government.

“The local Park Service staff were not willing to correct the false claims, so we went to the Regional Director,” Lunny said. “No help there. Then we went to the Park Service Director, and finally the Secretary of Interior. No one, at any level, was willing to admit that false science was being used against us, or to at least correct the record and stop the false accusations.”

The Interior Department’s own inspector general even found misconduct by agency officials and that they misrepresented facts. But even so, the inspector general was powerless to stop Parks Service officials from attacking Lunny’s business.

Eventually, Drakes Bay Oyster Farm closed its doors because of the litigation and regulatory actions taken by the federal government.

“What the Park Service did to our family was unconscionable,” Lunny said. “This polluted legacy of false science has tainted our dealings with state and federal agencies, and has resulted in unnecessary regulatory and legal action against our family and our farm.”

————————-
SOURCE: http://dailycaller.com/2015/04/29/oyster-farmer-we-are-terrified-of-the-govt/

08/04/2014 Oyster Farming is the “Wilderness”

AN EMAIL FROM A COLLEAGUE IN CONNECTICUT TODAY.

(Click on the link and then click to watch the video):

 

Oyster farming is the “Wilderness”………

Check this out – http://www.rhodyoysters.com/

Went there last weekend – “Farm to Table (his own Oyster Farm and his own Vegetable Farm)”. Now the Number 1 Restaurant in Rhode Island.

Get the message…………………… its sustainability.

Bruce McGown

CEO InterWeave.biz

 

 

 

 

08-21-14 GreenBiz wants examples of govt leaders actions to protect natural resources & my response

In a post today in Green Biz, Lizzie Needham, Associate Community Manager at GreenBiz Group, Top Contributor wrote

 

Dear GreenBiz Group Member,

According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, deforestation accounts for 10 percent of global emissions—a big number when you consider that this equates to around 3.0 billion tons of CO2 per year. Tensie Whelan, President of the Rainforest Alliance, fights to reduce deforestation by advocating for biodiversity protection and sustainable agricultural systems.

In her recent GreenBiz interview, Whelan claims that we are seeing exponential progress, particularly within the business world, but crucial action still lags. Whelan’s interview also reminds us that while business cooperation makes a difference, impactful natural resource protection transformations rely on government support. You can read Whelan’s full interview here: http://grn.bz/1uYujYX

Do any members have unique or impressive examples of government leaders taking significant action to protect natural resources?

I responded:

  • I have an example of government doing exactly the opposite in removing Drakes Bay Oyster Farm from the Point Reyes National Seashore in California. The DOI, the NPS, and the CCC have committed their own style of deforestation by misinterpreting the law, re-writing history, and trampling California State’s Rights in so doing. Worse, the beacons of environmental preservation cannot see the forest for the trees in that they are now stating the opposite of their position in the establishment of the Point Reyes National Seashore in 1962, the opposite of their position in the passing of the Wilderness Act in 1976. Even the then PRNS Superintendent, Don Neubacher has done a 180 on his position in his letter Oakland Bank in 1998 where he stated he had every intention of continuing the oyster farm after it’s lease expired in 2012. It is as if they cannot see the forest for the trees! DBOC is a locally produced, sustainable, renewable source of protein production – 40% of CA oysters are produced there and they were the LAST oyster cannery in CA. Oyster Bay Wildlife Refuge on Long Island has a commercial oyster farm that produces 90% of New York’s oysters

    If then why not now?
    If there why not here in CA?

    There is still hope with the lawsuit filed by the other oyster companies and businesses in the area who depend on Drakes Bay Oysters to stay in business.

    For the legal documents, legitimate scientific reports and more go to http://www.OysterZone.org or http://savedrakesbay.com/core/

  • Oyster farming and wilderness are not mutually exclusive.

11-22-96 The Letter from Neubacher to the Bank of Oakland, attesting to the NPS’s intention to renew the lease.

If then, why not now?

 

“….As stated previously, the NPS would like the planned improvements to occur at Johnsons. In fact, the NPS has worked with Marin County planners to insure the facilities attain county approval. Moreover, the Park’s General Management Plan also approved the continued use of the oyster company operation at Johnson on Drakes Estero….”

Click on the link below to see a copy of the actual letter from then Superintendent Don Neubacher to the Bank of Oakland

 

1996-11-22 Neubacher ltr to Bank of Oakland

07-31-14 The Absurdity of the Removal of DBOC from the earth, or the dillema of feeding 7 Billion today, 9 Billion by 2050

On the last day for retail sales a ceremony was held at DBOC at which a number of people were asked to speak. I was honored to be one of the speakers. Below is the transcript of the speech I gave after introducing myself, informing all of how I came to be involved, and a little about my involvement through this “blog”.

 

New York State’s only remaining commercial oyster farm operates on the OYSTER BAY NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, producing 90% of the State’s oyster harvest. The State of New York has designated the Oyster Bay area as a Significant Coastal Fish and Wildlife Habitat. …. If there, WHY NOT HERE?!

http://oysterbaytown.com/places-to-go-things-to-do/

cover of Nat’l Geographic, May 2014

THE NEW FOOD REVOLUTION –

To feed our hungry planet, we must change the way we farm – and the way we think.

By Jonathan Foley

DIRECTOR OF the Institute on the Environment, University of Minnesota.

“When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.”  from pg 35 of the hard copy

·        Agriculture is among the greatest contributors to global warming, emitting more greenhouse gases than all our cars, trucks, trains, and airplanes combined—largely from
o   methane released by cattle and rice farms,
o   nitrous oxide from fertilized fields, and
o   carbon dioxide from the cutting of rain forests to grow crops or raise livestock.
o   Farming is the thirstiest user of our precious water supplies
o   Runoff from fertilizers and manure makes Farming a major polluter
o   The spread of prosperity across the world, especially in China and India, is driving an increased demand for meat, eggs, and dairy, boosting pressure to grow more corn and soybeans to feed more cattle, pigs, and chickens.
o   As we’ve cleared areas of grassland and forest for farms, we’ve lost crucial habitat, making agriculture a major driver of wildlife extinction.
·
·        If these trends continue, the double whammy of population growth and richer diets will require us to roughly double the amount of crops we grow by 2050.
The author and his team proposed 5 steps to solve the world’s food dilemma.” I have taken his steps and included the validity of the argument to keep DBOC

1.    Freeze Agriculture’s Footprint…. Avoiding further deforestation must be a top priority.

o   OYSTER FARMING REQUIRES NO DEFORESTATION

2.   Grow More on Farms We’ve Got…. high-tech, precision farming systems, and borrowing from organic farming, could boost yields in several times over.

o   LEAVE DRAKES BAY OYSTER FARM RIGHT WHERE IT IS,

o   It doesn’t require high tech farming systems,

o   It is already 100% organic,

3.   Use Resources More Efficiently….. Organic farming can also greatly reduce the use of water and chemicals

       o   Oyster Farming requires neither fertilizers nor chemicals, and uses no added fresh water!

4.   Shift Diets…. Finding more efficient ways to grow meat and shifting to less meat-intensive diets…could free up substantial amounts of food  Curtailing the use of food crops for biofuels could also enhance food availability.

      o   Retaining a sustainable, renewable, ecologically and environmentally beneficial source of food production – OYSTER FARMING – will do that.  AND No one’s using oysters for bio-fuels!

5.  Reduce Waste.  25 % of the world’s food calories … are lost or wasted before they can be consumed. Tackling waste would be one of THE most effective options for boosting food availability.

o   Oysters come in individually, nature wrapped packages,

o   buy what you need, eat what you bought!

o   Even the shells are useful

§  whole they provide habitat restoration 

§  crushed they can be used

§  organic fertilizer

§  ground cover

Oyster production is the winner in solving the world food shortage dilema.

George Washington is purported to have said “Our country is an experiment” and he gave it 20 years.

I give this Wilderness Without Oysters experiment 20 years. It will be put back for both reasons environmental and necessity. We’ll have 9 Billion mouths to feed.

It will be too late for the Lunnys, their workers and families as well as all the ranchers and dairies on this peninsula – for the water filtration system provided by the oysters having been removed will leave them as the major polluter of the estero, and soon, they too, will HAVE to go, unless CONGRESS INTERVENES.

 

CONGRESS: YOU HAVE ALREADY REQUESTED INSTALLATION OF MORE OYSTER FARMS ON ALL OUR COASTS

CONGRESS: Don’t let this Empty Environmental Experiment ruin the lives of all these people AND EXTINGUISH THE AGRICULTURAL CHARACTER OF WEST MARIN.

CONGRESS, you have the power and the authority to reverse this decision.

CONGRESS ACT TO REVERSE THIS DECISION TODAY.

 

Write your congress person today, let them know you want this farm to stay!

 

07/31/14 Epoch Times, #1 Chinese Media Group, Sabrina Chang, Reporter, Coverage of DBOC last retail day

Sabrina Chang, Reporter for Epoch Times, the No. 1 Chinese Media Group was at the oyster farm on Thursday with a film crew.

Below is a link to her video that evening  in which Kevin Lunny, and others are recorded making short statements about the situation.

// // //

Ms Change also stated: We also have this piece of news on today’s Epoch Times newspaper.

08/03/14 Travel Channel video on Long Island, NY Oyster Farm in a Wildlife Refuge

TO SEE THE VIDEO, CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW

 

08-03-14 Commercial Oyster Farm in Nat’l Wildlife Refuge – 90% NY oysters produced there, if there WHY NOT HERE?

Wildlife & Habitat – Oyster Bay – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

  • Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge consists of 3,204 acres of bay bottom, salt marsh, and a small freshwater wetland. It is managed principally for use by migratory waterfowl and other waterbirds. It is also one of the few bay-bottom refuges owned and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The refuge is located off Long Island Sound, and the sheltered nature of the bay makes it extremely attractive as winter habitat for a variety of waterfowl species, especially diving ducks.

    The State of New York has designated the Oyster Bay area as a Significant Coastal Fish and Wildlife Habitat. Marine wildlife common to the refuge includes harbor seals, diamondback terrapins, and several species of sea turtles. Shellfish and finfish are abundant at Oyster Bay. The bay supports the only commercial oyster farm aquaculture operation remaining on Long Island, and an estimated 90 percent of the commercial oysters in New York originate from areas associated with the refuge.

     

    YOU WILL FIND THIS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE IF YOU GO TO THE LINK BELOW

    http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Oyster_Bay/wildlife_and_habitat/index.html

     

    ALSO, CHECK OUT THE TRAVEL CHANNEL VIDEO ON LONG ISLAND OYSTERS

     

     

07-10-2014 HOW TO CONTACT ANY CONGRESS PERSON

THE TIME FOR YOU TO RISE UP AND GET CONGRESS TO ACT TO REVERSE SALAZAR’S DECISION IS NOW!

 

http://www.house.gov/representatives/#state_ca

 

Directory of Representatives

Also referred to as a congressman or congresswoman, each representative is elected to a two-year term serving the people of a specific congressional district. The number of voting representatives in the House is fixed by law at no more than 435, proportionally representing the population of the 50 states. Currently, there are five delegates representing the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. A resident commissioner represents Puerto Rico. Learn more about representatives at The House Explained.

Alabama

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Byrne,Bradley R 2236 RHOB 202-225-4931 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources
2 Roby, Martha R 428 CHOB 202-225-2901 Appropriations
3 Rogers (AL), Mike R 324 CHOB 202-225-3261 Agriculture
Armed Services
Homeland Security
4 Aderholt, Robert R 2369 RHOB 202-225-4876 Appropriations
5 Brooks, Mo R 1230 LHOB 202-225-4801 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
6 Bachus, Spencer R 2246 RHOB 202-225-4921 Financial Services
the Judiciary
7 Sewell, Terri A. D 1133 LHOB 202-225-2665 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)

Alaska

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Young, Don R 2314 RHOB 202-225-5765 Natural Resources
Transportation

American Samoa

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Faleomavaega, Eni F. H. D 2422 RHOB 202-225-8577 Foreign Affairs
Natural Resources

Arizona

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Kirkpatrick, Ann D 330 CHOB 202-225-3361 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
2 Barber, Ron D 1029 LHOB 202-225-2542 Armed Services
Homeland Security
Small Business
3 Grijalva, Raul D 1511 LHOB 202-225-2435 Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources
4 Gosar, Paul A. R 504 CHOB 202-225-2315 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
5 Salmon, Matt R 2349 RHOB 202-225-2635 Education and the Workforce
Foreign Affairs
6 Schweikert, David R 1205 LHOB 202-225-2190 Science, Space, and Technology
Small Business
7 Pastor, Ed D 2465 RHOB 202-225-4065 Appropriations
Intelligence (Permanent)
8 Franks, Trent R 2435 RHOB 202-225-4576 Armed Services
the Judiciary
9 Sinema, Kyrsten D 1237 LHOB 202-225-9888 Financial Services

Arkansas

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Crawford, Rick R 1711 LHOB 202-225-4076 Agriculture
Transportation
2 Griffin, Tim R 1232 LHOB 202-225-2506 Ways and Means
3 Womack, Steve R 1119 LHOB 202-225-4301 Appropriations
4 Cotton, Tom R 415 CHOB 202-225-3772 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs

California

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 LaMalfa, Doug R 506 CHOB 202-225-3076 Agriculture
Natural Resources
2 Huffman, Jared D 1630 LHOB 202-225-5161 Natural Resources
the Budget
3 Garamendi, John D 2438 RHOB 202-225-1880 Agriculture
Armed Services
Transportation
4 McClintock, Tom R 434 CHOB 202-225-2511 Natural Resources
the Budget
5 Thompson, Mike D 231 CHOB 202-225-3311 Intelligence (Permanent)
Ways and Means
6 Matsui, Doris O. D 2434 RHOB 202-225-7163 Energy and Commerce
7 Bera, Ami D 1408 LHOB 202-225-5716 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
8 Cook, Paul R 1222 LHOB 202-225-5861 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
Veterans’ Affairs
9 McNerney, Jerry D 1210 LHOB 202-225-1947 Energy and Commerce
10 Denham, Jeff R 1730 LHOB 202-225-4540 Agriculture
Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
11 Miller, George D 2205 RHOB 202-225-2095 Education and the Workforce
12 Pelosi, Nancy D 235 CHOB 202-225-4965
13 Lee, Barbara D 2267 RHOB 202-225-2661 Appropriations
the Budget
14 Speier, Jackie D 211 CHOB 202-225-3531 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
15 Swalwell, Eric D 501 CHOB 202-225-5065 Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology
16 Costa, Jim D 1314 LHOB 202-225-3341 Agriculture
Natural Resources
17 Honda, Mike D 1713 LHOB 202-225-2631 Appropriations
18 Eshoo, Anna G. D 241 CHOB 202-225-8104 Energy and Commerce
19 Lofgren, Zoe D 1401 LHOB 202-225-3072 House Administration
Joint Library
Science, Space, and Technology
the Judiciary
20 Farr, Sam D 1126 LHOB 202-225-2861 Appropriations
21 Valadao, David R 1004 LHOB 202-225-4695 Appropriations
22 Nunes, Devin R 1013 LHOB 202-225-2523 Intelligence (Permanent)
Ways and Means
23 McCarthy, Kevin R 2421 RHOB 202-225-2915 Financial Services
24 Capps, Lois D 2231 RHOB 202-225-3601 Energy and Commerce
25 McKeon, Buck R 2310 RHOB 202-225-1956 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
26 Brownley, Julia D 1019 LHOB 202-225-5811 Science, Space, and Technology
Veterans’ Affairs
27 Chu, Judy D 1520 LHOB 202-225-5464 Small Business
the Judiciary
28 Schiff, Adam D 2411 RHOB 202-225-4176 Appropriations
Intelligence (Permanent)
29 Cárdenas, Tony D 1508 LHOB 202-225-6131 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
the Budget
30 Sherman, Brad D 2242 RHOB 202-225-5911 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
31 Miller, Gary R 2467 RHOB 202-225-3201 Financial Services
Transportation
32 Napolitano, Grace D 1610 LHOB 202-225-5256 Natural Resources
Transportation
33 Waxman, Henry D 2204 RHOB 202-225-3976 Energy and Commerce
34 Becerra, Xavier D 1226 LHOB 202-225-6235 Ways and Means
35 Negrete McLeod, Gloria D 1641 LHOB 202-225-6161 Agriculture
Veterans’ Affairs
36 Ruiz, Raul D 1319 LHOB 202-225-5330 Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
37 Bass, Karen D 408 CHOB 202-225-7084 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
38 Sanchez, Linda D 2423 RHOB 202-225-6676 Ethics
Ways and Means
39 Royce, Ed R 2185 RHOB 202-225-4111 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
40 Roybal-Allard, Lucille D 2330 RHOB 202-225-1766 Appropriations
41 Takano, Mark D 1507 LHOB 202-225-2305 Education and the Workforce
Veterans’ Affairs
42 Calvert, Ken R 2269 RHOB 202-225-1986 Appropriations
the Budget
43 Waters, Maxine D 2221 RHOB 202-225-2201 Financial Services
44 Hahn, Janice D 404 CHOB 202-225-8220 Small Business
Transportation
45 Campbell, John R 2331 RHOB 202-225-5611 Financial Services
the Budget
46 Sanchez, Loretta D 1114 LHOB 202-225-2965 Armed Services
Homeland Security
47 Lowenthal, Alan D 515 CHOB 202-225-7924 Foreign Affairs
Natural Resources
48 Rohrabacher, Dana R 2300 RHOB 202-225-2415 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
49 Issa, Darrell R 2347 RHOB 202-225-3906 Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
50 Hunter, Duncan D. R 223 CHOB 202-225-5672 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Transportation
51 Vargas, Juan D 1605 LHOB 202-225-8045 Agriculture
Foreign Affairs
House Administration
52 Peters, Scott D 2410 RHOB 202-225-0508 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
53 Davis, Susan D 1526 LHOB 202-225-2040 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce

Colorado

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 DeGette, Diana D 2368 RHOB 202-225-4431 Energy and Commerce
2 Polis, Jared D 1433 LHOB 202-225-2161 Education and the Workforce
Rules
3 Tipton, Scott R 218 CHOB 202-225-4761 Agriculture
Natural Resources
Small Business
4 Gardner, Cory R 213 CHOB 202-225-4676 Energy and Commerce
5 Lamborn, Doug R 2402 RHOB 202-225-4422 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
6 Coffman, Mike R 2443 RHOB 202-225-7882 Armed Services
Small Business
Veterans’ Affairs
7 Perlmutter, Ed D 1410 LHOB 202-225-2645 Financial Services

Connecticut

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Larson, John B. D 1501 LHOB 202-225-2265 Ways and Means
2 Courtney, Joe D 2348 RHOB 202-225-2076 Agriculture
Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
3 DeLauro, Rosa L. D 2413 RHOB 202-225-3661 Appropriations
4 Himes, Jim D 119 CHOB 202-225-5541 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
5 Esty, Elizabeth D 509 CHOB 202-225-4476 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation

Delaware

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Carney, John D 1406 LHOB 202-225-4165 Financial Services

District of Columbia

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Norton, Eleanor Holmes D 2136 RHOB 202-225-8050 Oversight and Government
Transportation

Florida

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Miller, Jeff R 336 CHOB 202-225-4136 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Veterans’ Affairs
2 Southerland, Steve R 1229 LHOB 202-225-5235 Natural Resources
Transportation
3 Yoho, Ted R 511 CHOB 202-225-5744 Agriculture
Foreign Affairs
4 Crenshaw, Ander R 440 CHOB 202-225-2501 Appropriations
5 Brown, Corrine D 2111 RHOB 202-225-0123 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
6 DeSantis, Ron R 427 CHOB 202-225-2706 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
7 Mica, John R 2187 RHOB 202-225-4035 Oversight and Government
Transportation
8 Posey, Bill R 120 CHOB 202-225-3671 Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
9 Grayson, Alan D 430 CHOB 202-225-9889 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
10 Webster, Daniel R 1039 LHOB 202-225-2176 Rules
Transportation
11 Nugent, Richard R 1727 LHOB 202-225-1002 Armed Services
House Administration
Rules
12 Bilirakis, Gus M. R 2313 RHOB 202-225-5755 Energy and Commerce
Veterans’ Affairs
13 Jolly, David R 2407 RHOB 202-225-5961 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
14 Castor, Kathy D 205 CHOB 202-225-3376 Energy and Commerce
the Budget
15 Ross, Dennis R 229 CHOB 202-225-1252 Financial Services
16 Buchanan, Vern R 2104 RHOB 202-225-5015 Ways and Means
17 Rooney, Tom R 221 CHOB 202-225-5792 Appropriations
Intelligence (Permanent)
18 Murphy, Patrick D 1517 LHOB 202-225-3026 Financial Services
Small Business
19 Clawson,Curt R 1123 LHOB 202-225-2536
20 Hastings, Alcee L. D 2353 RHOB 202-225-1313 Rules
21 Deutch, Ted D 1024 LHOB 202-225-3001 Ethics
Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
22 Frankel, Lois D 1037 LHOB 202-225-9890 Foreign Affairs
Transportation
23 Wasserman Schultz, Debbie D 118 CHOB 202-225-7931 Appropriations
24 Wilson, Frederica D 208 CHOB 202-225-4506 Education and the Workforce
Science, Space, and Technology
25 Diaz-Balart, Mario R 436 CHOB 202-225-4211 Appropriations
26 Garcia, Joe D 1440 LHOB 202-225-2778 Natural Resources
the Judiciary
27 Ros-Lehtinen, Ileana R 2206 RHOB 202-225-3931 Foreign Affairs
Rules

Georgia

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Kingston, Jack R 2372 RHOB 202-225-5831 Appropriations
2 Bishop Jr., Sanford D. D 2429 RHOB 202-225-3631 Appropriations
3 Westmoreland, Lynn A. R 2433 RHOB 202-225-5901 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
4 Johnson, Henry C. “Hank” Jr. D 2240 RHOB 202-225-1605 Armed Services
the Judiciary
5 Lewis, John D 343 CHOB 202-225-3801 Ways and Means
6 Price, Tom R 100 CHOB 202-225-4501 Education and the Workforce
the Budget
Ways and Means
7 Woodall, Robert R 1725 LHOB 202-225-4272 Oversight and Government
Rules
the Budget
8 Scott, Austin R 516 CHOB 202-225-6531 Agriculture
Armed Services
9 Collins, Doug R 513 CHOB 202-225-9893 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
10 Broun, Paul C. R 2437 RHOB 202-225-4101 Homeland Security
Natural Resources
Science, Space, and Technology
11 Gingrey, Phil R 442 CHOB 202-225-2931 Energy and Commerce
House Administration
12 Barrow, John D 2202 RHOB 202-225-2823 Energy and Commerce
13 Scott, David D 225 CHOB 202-225-2939 Agriculture
Financial Services
14 Graves, Tom R 432 CHOB 202-225-5211 Appropriations

Guam

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Bordallo, Madeleine D 2441 RHOB 202-225-1188 Armed Services
Natural Resources

Hawaii

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Hanabusa, Colleen D 238 CHOB 202-225-2726 Armed Services
Natural Resources
2 Gabbard, Tulsi D 502 CHOB 202-225-4906 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs

Idaho

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Labrador, Raul R. R 1523 LHOB 202-225-6611 Natural Resources
the Judiciary
2 Simpson, Mike R 2312 RHOB 202-225-5531 Appropriations

Illinois

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Rush, Bobby L. D 2268 RHOB 202-225-4372 Energy and Commerce
2 Kelly, Robin D 2419 RHOB 202-225-0773 Oversight and Government
Science, Space, and Technology
3 Lipinski, Daniel D 1717 LHOB 202-225-5701 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
4 Gutierrez, Luis D 2408 RHOB 202-225-8203 Intelligence (Permanent)
the Judiciary
5 Quigley, Mike D 1124 LHOB 202-225-4061 Appropriations
6 Roskam, Peter J. R 227 CHOB 202-225-4561 Ways and Means
7 Davis, Danny K. D 2159 RHOB 202-225-5006 Oversight and Government
Ways and Means
8 Duckworth, Tammy D 104 CHOB 202-225-3711 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
9 Schakowsky, Jan D 2367 RHOB 202-225-2111 Energy and Commerce
Intelligence (Permanent)
10 Schneider, Brad D 317 CHOB 202-225-4835 Foreign Affairs
Small Business
11 Foster, Bill D 1224 LHOB 202-225-3515 Financial Services
12 Enyart, William D 1722 LHOB 202-225-5661 Agriculture
Armed Services
13 Davis, Rodney R 1740 LHOB 202-225-2371 Agriculture
Transportation
14 Hultgren, Randy R 332 CHOB 202-225-2976 Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
15 Shimkus, John R 2452 RHOB 202-225-5271 Energy and Commerce
16 Kinzinger, Adam R 1221 LHOB 202-225-3635 Energy and Commerce
Foreign Affairs
17 Bustos, Cheri D 1009 LHOB 202-225-5905 Agriculture
Transportation
18 Schock, Aaron R 328 CHOB 202-225-6201 House Administration
Ways and Means

Indiana

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Visclosky, Peter D 2256 RHOB 202-225-2461 Appropriations
2 Walorski, Jackie R 419 CHOB 202-225-3915 Armed Services
the Budget
Veterans’ Affairs
3 Stutzman, Marlin R 1728 LHOB 202-225-4436 Financial Services
4 Rokita, Todd R 236 CHOB 202-225-5037 Education and the Workforce
House Administration
the Budget
5 Brooks, Susan W. R 1505 LHOB 202-225-2276 Education and the Workforce
Ethics
Homeland Security
6 Messer, Luke R 508 CHOB 202-225-3021 Education and the Workforce
Financial Services
7 Carson, André D 2453 RHOB 202-225-4011 Armed Services
Transportation
8 Bucshon, Larry R 1005 LHOB 202-225-4636 Education and the Workforce
Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
9 Young, Todd R 1007 LHOB 202-225-5315 Ways and Means

Iowa

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Braley, Bruce L. D 2263 RHOB 202-225-2911 Energy and Commerce
2 Loebsack, David D 1527 LHOB 202-225-6576 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
3 Latham, Tom R 2217 RHOB 202-225-5476 Appropriations
4 King, Steve R 2210 RHOB 202-225-4426 Agriculture
Small Business
the Judiciary

Kansas

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Huelskamp, Tim R 129 CHOB 202-225-2715 Small Business
Veterans’ Affairs
2 Jenkins, Lynn R 1027 LHOB 202-225-6601 Ways and Means
3 Yoder, Kevin R 215 CHOB 202-225-2865 Appropriations
4 Pompeo, Mike R 107 CHOB 202-225-6216 Energy and Commerce
Intelligence (Permanent)

Kentucky

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Whitfield, Ed R 2184 RHOB 202-225-3115 Energy and Commerce
2 Guthrie, S. Brett R 308 CHOB 202-225-3501 Education and the Workforce
Energy and Commerce
3 Yarmuth, John A. D 403 CHOB 202-225-5401 Energy and Commerce
the Budget
4 Massie, Thomas R 314 CHOB 202-225-3465 Oversight and Government
Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
5 Rogers, Harold R 2406 RHOB 202-225-4601 Appropriations
6 Barr, Andy R 1432 LHOB 202-225-4706 Financial Services

Louisiana

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Scalise, Steve R 2338 RHOB 202-225-3015 Energy and Commerce
2 Richmond, Cedric D 240 CHOB 202-225-6636 Homeland Security
the Judiciary
3 Boustany Jr., Charles W. R 1431 LHOB 202-225-2031 Ways and Means
4 Fleming, John R 416 CHOB 202-225-2777 Armed Services
Natural Resources
5 McAllister, Vance R 316 CHOB 202-225-8490 Agriculture
Natural Resources
6 Cassidy, William R 1131 LHOB 202-225-3901 Energy and Commerce

Maine

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Pingree, Chellie D 1318 LHOB 202-225-6116 Appropriations
2 Michaud, Michael D 1724 LHOB 202-225-6306 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs

Maryland

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Harris, Andy R 1533 LHOB 202-225-5311 Appropriations
2 Ruppersberger, Dutch D 2416 RHOB 202-225-3061 Intelligence (Permanent)
3 Sarbanes, John P. D 2444 RHOB 202-225-4016 Energy and Commerce
4 Edwards, Donna F. D 2445 RHOB 202-225-8699 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
5 Hoyer, Steny H. D 1705 LHOB 202-225-4131
6 Delaney, John D 1632 LHOB 202-225-2721 Financial Services
7 Cummings, Elijah D 2235 RHOB 202-225-4741 Oversight and Government
Transportation
8 Van Hollen, Chris D 1707 LHOB 202-225-5341 the Budget

Massachusetts

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Neal, Richard E. D 2208 RHOB 202-225-5601 Ways and Means
2 McGovern, James D 438 CHOB 202-225-6101 Agriculture
Rules
3 Tsongas, Niki D 1607 LHOB 202-225-3411 Armed Services
Natural Resources
4 Kennedy III, Joseph P. D 1218 LHOB 202-225-5931 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
5 Clark, Katherine D 2108 RHOB 202-225-2836 Natural Resources
Science, Space, and Technology
6 Tierney, John D 2238 RHOB 202-225-8020 Education and the Workforce
Oversight and Government
7 Capuano, Michael E. D 1414 LHOB 202-225-5111 Ethics
Financial Services
Transportation
8 Lynch, Stephen F. D 2133 RHOB 202-225-8273 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
9 Keating, William D 315 CHOB 202-225-3111 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security

Michigan

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Benishek, Dan R 514 CHOB 202-225-4735 Agriculture
Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
2 Huizenga, Bill R 1217 LHOB 202-225-4401 Financial Services
3 Amash, Justin R 114 CHOB 202-225-3831 Oversight and Government
4 Camp, Dave R 341 CHOB 202-225-3561 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
5 Kildee, Daniel D 327 CHOB 202-225-3611 Financial Services
the Budget
6 Upton, Fred R 2183 RHOB 202-225-3761 Energy and Commerce
7 Walberg, Tim R 2436 RHOB 202-225-6276 Education and the Workforce
Oversight and Government
8 Rogers (MI), Mike R 2112 RHOB 202-225-4872 Energy and Commerce
Intelligence (Permanent)
9 Levin, Sander D 1236 LHOB 202-225-4961 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
10 Miller, Candice R 320 CHOB 202-225-2106 Homeland Security
House Administration
Joint Library
Transportation
11 Bentivolio, Kerry R 226 CHOB 202-225-8171 Oversight and Government
Small Business
12 Dingell, John D 2328 RHOB 202-225-4071 Energy and Commerce
13 Conyers Jr., John D 2426 RHOB 202-225-5126 the Judiciary
14 Peters, Gary D 1609 LHOB 202-225-5802 Financial Services

Minnesota

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Walz, Timothy J. D 1034 LHOB 202-225-2472 Agriculture
Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
2 Kline, John R 2439 RHOB 202-225-2271 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
3 Paulsen, Erik R 127 CHOB 202-225-2871 Ways and Means
4 McCollum, Betty D 1714 LHOB 202-225-6631 Appropriations
5 Ellison, Keith D 2244 RHOB 202-225-4755 Financial Services
6 Bachmann, Michele R 2417 RHOB 202-225-2331 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
7 Peterson, Collin C. D 2109 RHOB 202-225-2165 Agriculture
8 Nolan, Rick D 2447 RHOB 202-225-6211 Agriculture
Transportation

Mississippi

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Nunnelee, Alan R 1427 LHOB 202-225-4306 Appropriations
the Budget
2 Thompson, Bennie G. D 2466 RHOB 202-225-5876 Homeland Security
3 Harper, Gregg R 307 CHOB 202-225-5031 Energy and Commerce
House Administration
Joint Library
4 Palazzo, Steven R 331 CHOB 202-225-5772 Armed Services
Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology

Missouri

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Clay Jr., William “Lacy” D 2418 RHOB 202-225-2406 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
2 Wagner, Ann R 435 CHOB 202-225-1621 Financial Services
3 Luetkemeyer, Blaine R 2440 RHOB 202-225-2956 Financial Services
Small Business
4 Hartzler, Vicky R 1023 LHOB 202-225-2876 Agriculture
Armed Services
the Budget
5 Cleaver, Emanuel D 2335 RHOB 202-225-4535 Financial Services
6 Graves, Sam R 1415 LHOB 202-225-7041 Small Business
Transportation
7 Long, Billy R 1541 LHOB 202-225-6536 Energy and Commerce
8 Smith, Jason R 2230 RHOB 202-225-4404 Natural Resources
the Judiciary

Montana

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Daines, Steve R 206 CHOB 202-225-3211 Homeland Security
Natural Resources
Transportation

Nebraska

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Fortenberry, Jeff R 1514 LHOB 202-225-4806 Appropriations
2 Terry, Lee R 2266 RHOB 202-225-4155 Energy and Commerce
3 Smith, Adrian R 2241 RHOB 202-225-6435 Ways and Means

Nevada

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Titus, Dina D 401 CHOB 202-225-5965 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
2 Amodei, Mark R 222 CHOB 202-225-6155 Appropriations
3 Heck, Joe R 132 CHOB 202-225-3252 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Intelligence (Permanent)
4 Horsford, Steven D 1330 LHOB 202-225-9894 Financial Services
Oversight and Government

New Hampshire

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Shea-Porter, Carol D 1530 LHOB 202-225-5456 Armed Services
Natural Resources
2 Kuster, Ann D 137 CHOB 202-225-5206 Agriculture
Small Business
Veterans’ Affairs

New Jersey

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Andrews, Robert E. Vacancy D 2265 RHOB 202-225-6501
2 LoBiondo, Frank R 2427 RHOB 202-225-6572 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Transportation
3 Runyan, Jon R 1239 LHOB 202-225-4765 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
4 Smith, Chris R 2373 RHOB 202-225-3765 Foreign Affairs
5 Garrett, Scott R 2232 RHOB 202-225-4465 Financial Services
the Budget
6 Pallone Jr., Frank D 237 CHOB 202-225-4671 Energy and Commerce
Natural Resources
7 Lance, Leonard R 133 CHOB 202-225-5361 Energy and Commerce
8 Sires, Albio D 2342 RHOB 202-225-7919 Foreign Affairs
Transportation
9 Pascrell Jr., Bill D 2370 RHOB 202-225-5751 the Budget
Ways and Means
10 Payne Jr., Donald D 103 CHOB 202-225-3436 Homeland Security
Small Business
11 Frelinghuysen, Rodney R 2306 RHOB 202-225-5034 Appropriations
12 Holt, Rush D 1214 LHOB 202-225-5801 Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources

New Mexico

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Lujan Grisham, Michelle D 214 CHOB 202-225-6316 Agriculture
Oversight and Government
the Budget
2 Pearce, Steve R 2432 RHOB 202-225-2365 Financial Services
3 Lujan, Ben R. D 2446 RHOB 202-225-6190 Energy and Commerce

New York

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Bishop, Timothy D 306 CHOB 202-225-3826 Education and the Workforce
Transportation
2 King, Pete R 339 CHOB 202-225-7896 Financial Services
Homeland Security
Intelligence (Permanent)
3 Israel, Steve D 2457 RHOB 202-225-3335
4 McCarthy, Carolyn D 2346 RHOB 202-225-5516 Education and the Workforce
Financial Services
5 Meeks, Gregory W. D 2234 RHOB 202-225-3461 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
6 Meng, Grace D 1317 LHOB 202-225-2601 Foreign Affairs
Small Business
7 Velázquez, Nydia M. D 2302 RHOB 202-225-2361 Financial Services
Small Business
8 Jeffries, Hakeem D 1339 LHOB 202-225-5936 the Budget
the Judiciary
9 Clarke, Yvette D. D 2351 RHOB 202-225-6231 Ethics
Homeland Security
Small Business
10 Nadler, Jerrold D 2110 RHOB 202-225-5635 the Judiciary
Transportation
11 Grimm, Michael R 512 CHOB 202-225-3371
12 Maloney, Carolyn D 2308 RHOB 202-225-7944 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
13 Rangel, Charles B. D 2354 RHOB 202-225-4365 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
14 Crowley, Joseph D 1436 LHOB 202-225-3965 Ways and Means
15 Serrano, José E. D 2227 RHOB 202-225-4361 Appropriations
16 Engel, Eliot D 2161 RHOB 202-225-2464 Energy and Commerce
Foreign Affairs
17 Lowey, Nita D 2365 RHOB 202-225-6506 Appropriations
18 Maloney, Sean Patrick D 1529 LHOB 202-225-5441 Agriculture
Transportation
19 Gibson, Chris R 1708 LHOB 202-225-5614 Agriculture
Armed Services
20 Tonko, Paul D. D 2463 RHOB 202-225-5076 Energy and Commerce
21 Owens, Bill D 405 CHOB 202-225-4611 Appropriations
22 Hanna, Richard R 319 CHOB 202-225-3665 Small Business
Transportation
23 Reed, Tom R 1504 LHOB 202-225-3161 Ways and Means
24 Maffei, Daniel D 422 CHOB 202-225-3701 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
25 Slaughter, Louise D 2469 RHOB 202-225-3615 Rules
26 Higgins, Brian D 2459 RHOB 202-225-3306 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
27 Collins, Chris R 1117 LHOB 202-225-5265 Agriculture
Science, Space, and Technology
Small Business

North Carolina

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Butterfield, G.K. D 2305 RHOB 202-225-3101 Energy and Commerce
2 Ellmers, Renee R 426 CHOB 202-225-4531 Energy and Commerce
3 Jones, Walter B. R 2333 RHOB 202-225-3415 Armed Services
4 Price, David D 2162 RHOB 202-225-1784 Appropriations
5 Foxx, Virginia R 2350 RHOB 202-225-2071 Education and the Workforce
Rules
6 Coble, Howard R 2188 RHOB 202-225-3065 the Judiciary
Transportation
7 McIntyre, Mike D 2428 RHOB 202-225-2731 Agriculture
Armed Services
8 Hudson, Richard R 429 CHOB 202-225-3715 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce
Homeland Security
9 Pittenger, Robert R 224 CHOB 202-225-1976 Financial Services
10 McHenry, Patrick T. R 2334 RHOB 202-225-2576 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
11 Meadows, Mark R 1516 LHOB 202-225-6401 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government
Transportation
12 Watt, Mel Vacancy D 2304 RHOB 202-225-1510
13 Holding, George R 507 CHOB 202-225-3032 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary

North Dakota

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Cramer, Kevin R 1032 LHOB 202-225-2611 Natural Resources
Science, Space, and Technology

Northern Mariana Islands

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Sablan, Gregorio D 423 CHOB 202-225-2646 Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources

Ohio

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Chabot, Steve R 2371 RHOB 202-225-2216 Foreign Affairs
Small Business
the Judiciary
2 Wenstrup, Brad R 1223 LHOB 202-225-3164 Armed Services
Veterans’ Affairs
3 Beatty, Joyce D 417 CHOB 202-225-4324 Financial Services
4 Jordan, Jim R 1524 LHOB 202-225-2676 Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
5 Latta, Robert E. R 2448 RHOB 202-225-6405 Energy and Commerce
6 Johnson, Bill R 1710 LHOB 202-225-5705 Energy and Commerce
Science, Space, and Technology
7 Gibbs, Bob R 329 CHOB 202-225-6265 Agriculture
Transportation
8 Boehner, John A. R 1011 LHOB 202-225-6205
9 Kaptur, Marcy D 2186 RHOB 202-225-4146 Appropriations
10 Turner, Michael R 2239 RHOB 202-225-6465 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
11 Fudge, Marcia L. D 2344 RHOB 202-225-7032 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce
12 Tiberi, Pat R 106 CHOB 202-225-5355 Ways and Means
13 Ryan, Tim D 1421 LHOB 202-225-5261 Appropriations
the Budget
14 Joyce, David R 1535 LHOB 202-225-5731 Appropriations
15 Stivers, Steve R 1022 LHOB 202-225-2015 Financial Services
16 Renacci, Jim R 130 CHOB 202-225-3876 Ways and Means

Oklahoma

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Bridenstine, Jim R 216 CHOB 202-225-2211 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
2 Mullin, Markwayne R 1113 LHOB 202-225-2701 Natural Resources
Transportation
3 Lucas, Frank R 2311 RHOB 202-225-5565 Agriculture
Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
4 Cole, Tom R 2458 RHOB 202-225-6165 Appropriations
Joint Library
Rules
the Budget
5 Lankford, James R 228 CHOB 202-225-2132 Oversight and Government
the Budget

Oregon

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Bonamici, Suzanne D 439 CHOB 202-225-0855 Education and the Workforce
Science, Space, and Technology
2 Walden, Greg R 2182 RHOB 202-225-6730 Energy and Commerce
3 Blumenauer, Earl D 1111 LHOB 202-225-4811 the Budget
Ways and Means
4 DeFazio, Peter D 2134 RHOB 202-225-6416 Natural Resources
Transportation
5 Schrader, Kurt D 108 CHOB 202-225-5711 Agriculture
Small Business
the Budget

Pennsylvania

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Brady, Robert D 102 CHOB 202-225-4731 Armed Services
House Administration
Joint Library
2 Fattah, Chaka D 2301 RHOB 202-225-4001 Appropriations
3 Kelly, Mike R 1519 LHOB 202-225-5406 Education and the Workforce
Ways and Means
4 Perry, Scott R 126 CHOB 202-225-5836 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Transportation
5 Thompson, Glenn W. R 124 CHOB 202-225-5121 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources
6 Gerlach, Jim R 2442 RHOB 202-225-4315 Ways and Means
7 Meehan, Pat R 204 CHOB 202-225-2011 Ethics
Homeland Security
Oversight and Government
Transportation
8 Fitzpatrick, Michael G. R 2400 RHOB 202-225-4276 Financial Services
9 Shuster, Bill R 2209 RHOB 202-225-2431 Armed Services
Transportation
10 Marino, Tom R 410 CHOB 202-225-3731 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
the Judiciary
11 Barletta, Lou R 115 CHOB 202-225-6511 Education and the Workforce
Homeland Security
Transportation
12 Rothfus, Keith R 503 CHOB 202-225-2065 Financial Services
13 Schwartz, Allyson Y. D 1227 LHOB 202-225-6111 Ways and Means
14 Doyle, Mike D 239 CHOB 202-225-2135 Energy and Commerce
15 Dent, Charles W. R 2455 RHOB 202-225-6411 Appropriations
Ethics
16 Pitts, Joseph R. R 420 CHOB 202-225-2411 Energy and Commerce
17 Cartwright, Matthew D 1419 LHOB 202-225-5546 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
18 Murphy, Tim R 2332 RHOB 202-225-2301 Energy and Commerce

Puerto Rico

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Pierluisi, Pedro D 1213 LHOB 202-225-2615 Ethics
Natural Resources
the Judiciary

Rhode Island

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Cicilline, David D 128 CHOB 202-225-4911 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
2 Langevin, Jim D 109 CHOB 202-225-2735 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)

South Carolina

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Sanford, Mark R 322 CHOB 202-225-3176 Homeland Security
Transportation
2 Wilson, Joe R 2229 RHOB 202-225-2452 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Foreign Affairs
3 Duncan, Jeff R 116 CHOB 202-225-5301 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Natural Resources
4 Gowdy, Trey R 1404 LHOB 202-225-6030 Ethics
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
5 Mulvaney, Mick R 1207 LHOB 202-225-5501 Financial Services
Small Business
6 Clyburn, James E. D 242 CHOB 202-225-3315
7 Rice, Tom R 325 CHOB 202-225-9895 Small Business
the Budget
Transportation

South Dakota

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Noem, Kristi R 1323 LHOB 202-225-2801 Agriculture
Armed Services

Tennessee

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Roe, Phil R 407 CHOB 202-225-6356 Education and the Workforce
Veterans’ Affairs
2 Duncan Jr., John J. R 2207 RHOB 202-225-5435 Oversight and Government
Transportation
3 Fleischmann, Chuck R 230 CHOB 202-225-3271 Appropriations
4 DesJarlais, Scott R 413 CHOB 202-225-6831 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce
Oversight and Government
5 Cooper, Jim D 1536 LHOB 202-225-4311 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
6 Black, Diane R 1531 LHOB 202-225-4231 the Budget
Ways and Means
7 Blackburn, Marsha R 217 CHOB 202-225-2811 Energy and Commerce
the Budget
8 Fincher, Stephen R 1118 LHOB 202-225-4714 Agriculture
Financial Services
9 Cohen, Steve D 2404 RHOB 202-225-3265 the Judiciary
Transportation

Texas

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Gohmert, Louie R 2243 RHOB 202-225-3035 Natural Resources
the Judiciary
2 Poe, Ted R 2412 RHOB 202-225-6565 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
3 Johnson, Sam R 1211 LHOB 202-225-4201 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
4 Hall, Ralph M. R 2405 RHOB 202-225-6673 Energy and Commerce
Science, Space, and Technology
5 Hensarling, Jeb R 2228 RHOB 202-225-3484 Financial Services
6 Barton, Joe R 2107 RHOB 202-225-2002 Energy and Commerce
7 Culberson, John R 2352 RHOB 202-225-2571 Appropriations
8 Brady, Kevin R 301 CHOB 202-225-4901 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
9 Green, Al D 2201 RHOB 202-225-7508 Financial Services
10 McCaul, Michael T. R 131 CHOB 202-225-2401 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology
11 Conaway, K. Michael R 2430 RHOB 202-225-3605 Agriculture
Armed Services
Ethics
Intelligence (Permanent)
12 Granger, Kay R 1026 LHOB 202-225-5071 Appropriations
13 Thornberry, Mac R 2329 RHOB 202-225-3706 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
14 Weber, Randy R 510 CHOB 202-225-2831 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
15 Hinojosa, Rubén D 2262 RHOB 202-225-2531 Education and the Workforce
Financial Services
16 O’Rourke, Beto D 1721 LHOB 202-225-4831 Homeland Security
Veterans’ Affairs
17 Flores, Bill R 1030 LHOB 202-225-6105 Natural Resources
the Budget
Veterans’ Affairs
18 Jackson Lee, Sheila D 2160 RHOB 202-225-3816 Homeland Security
the Judiciary
19 Neugebauer, Randy R 1424 LHOB 202-225-4005 Agriculture
Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
20 Castro, Joaquin D 212 CHOB 202-225-3236 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
21 Smith, Lamar R 2409 RHOB 202-225-4236 Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology
the Judiciary
22 Olson, Pete R 312 CHOB 202-225-5951 Energy and Commerce
23 Gallego, Pete D 431 CHOB 202-225-4511 Agriculture
Armed Services
24 Marchant, Kenny R 1110 LHOB 202-225-6605 Education and the Workforce
Ways and Means
25 Williams, Roger R 1122 LHOB 202-225-9896 the Budget
Transportation
26 Burgess, Michael R 2336 RHOB 202-225-7772 Energy and Commerce
Rules
27 Farenthold, Blake R 117 CHOB 202-225-7742 Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
Transportation
28 Cuellar, Henry D 2431 RHOB 202-225-1640 Appropriations
29 Green, Gene D 2470 RHOB 202-225-1688 Energy and Commerce
30 Johnson, Eddie Bernice D 2468 RHOB 202-225-8885 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
31 Carter, John R 409 CHOB 202-225-3864 Appropriations
32 Sessions, Pete R 2233 RHOB 202-225-2231 Rules
33 Veasey, Marc D 414 CHOB 202-225-9897 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
34 Vela, Filemon D 437 CHOB 202-225-9901 Agriculture
Homeland Security
35 Doggett, Lloyd D 201 CHOB 202-225-4865 the Budget
Ways and Means
36 Stockman, Steve R 326 CHOB 202-225-1555 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology

Utah

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Bishop, Rob R 123 CHOB 202-225-0453 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Rules
2 Stewart, Chris R 323 CHOB 202-225-9730 Appropriations
3 Chaffetz, Jason R 2464 RHOB 202-225-7751 Homeland Security
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
4 Matheson, Jim D 2211 RHOB 202-225-3011 Energy and Commerce

Vermont

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Welch, Peter D 2303 RHOB 202-225-4115 Energy and Commerce
Oversight and Government

Virgin Islands

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Christensen, Donna M., D 1510 LHOB 202-225-1790 Energy and Commerce

Virginia

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Wittman, Robert J. R 2454 RHOB 202-225-4261 Armed Services
Natural Resources
2 Rigell, Scott R 418 CHOB 202-225-4215 Armed Services
the Budget
3 Scott, Robert C. D 1201 LHOB 202-225-8351 Education and the Workforce
the Judiciary
4 Forbes, J. Randy R 2135 RHOB 202-225-6365 Armed Services
the Judiciary
5 Hurt, Robert R 125 CHOB 202-225-4711 Financial Services
6 Goodlatte, Bob R 2309 RHOB 202-225-5431 Agriculture
the Judiciary
7 Cantor, Eric R 303 CHOB 202-225-2815
8 Moran, James D 2252 RHOB 202-225-4376 Appropriations
9 Griffith, Morgan R 1108 LHOB 202-225-3861 Energy and Commerce
10 Wolf, Frank R 233 CHOB 202-225-5136 Appropriations
11 Connolly, Gerald E. “Gerry” D 424 CHOB 202-225-1492 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government

Washington

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 DelBene, Suzan D 318 CHOB 202-225-6311 Agriculture
the Judiciary
2 Larsen, Rick D 2113 RHOB 202-225-2605 Armed Services
Transportation
3 Herrera Beutler, Jaime R 1130 LHOB 202-225-3536 Appropriations
Small Business
4 Hastings, Doc R 1203 LHOB 202-225-5816 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
5 McMorris Rodgers, Cathy R 203 CHOB 202-225-2006 Energy and Commerce
6 Kilmer, Derek D 1429 LHOB 202-225-5916 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
7 McDermott, Jim D 1035 LHOB 202-225-3106 the Budget
Ways and Means
8 Reichert, David G. R 1127 LHOB 202-225-7761 Ways and Means
9 Smith, Adam D 2264 RHOB 202-225-8901 Armed Services
10 Heck, Denny D 425 CHOB 202-225-9740 Financial Services

West Virginia

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 McKinley, David R 412 CHOB 202-225-4172 Energy and Commerce
2 Capito, Shelley Moore R 2366 RHOB 202-225-2711 Financial Services
Transportation
3 Rahall, Nick D 2307 RHOB 202-225-3452 Transportation

Wisconsin

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 Ryan, Paul R 1233 LHOB 202-225-3031 the Budget
Ways and Means
2 Pocan, Mark D 313 CHOB 202-225-2906 Education and the Workforce
the Budget
3 Kind, Ron D 1502 LHOB 202-225-5506 Ways and Means
4 Moore, Gwen D 2245 RHOB 202-225-4572 Financial Services
the Budget
5 Sensenbrenner, F. James R 2449 RHOB 202-225-5101 Science, Space, and Technology
the Judiciary
6 Petri, Thomas R 2462 RHOB 202-225-2476 Education and the Workforce
Transportation
7 Duffy, Sean P. R 1208 LHOB 202-225-3365 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
the Budget
8 Ribble, Reid R 1513 LHOB 202-225-5665 Agriculture
the Budget
Transportation

Wyoming

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
At Large Lummis, Cynthia M. R 113 CHOB 202-225-2311 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
Science, Space, and Technology

A

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Aderholt, Robert Alabama 4th District R 2369 RHOB 202-225-4876 Appropriations
Amash, Justin Michigan 3rd District R 114 CHOB 202-225-3831 Oversight and Government
Amodei, Mark Nevada 2nd District R 222 CHOB 202-225-6155 Appropriations
Andrews, Robert E. Vacancy New Jersey 1st District D 2265 RHOB 202-225-6501

B

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Bachmann, Michele Minnesota 6th District R 2417 RHOB 202-225-2331 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Bachus, Spencer Alabama 6th District R 2246 RHOB 202-225-4921 Financial Services
the Judiciary
Barber, Ron Arizona 2nd District D 1029 LHOB 202-225-2542 Armed Services
Homeland Security
Small Business
Barletta, Lou Pennsylvania 11th District R 115 CHOB 202-225-6511 Education and the Workforce
Homeland Security
Transportation
Barr, Andy Kentucky 6th District R 1432 LHOB 202-225-4706 Financial Services
Barrow, John Georgia 12th District D 2202 RHOB 202-225-2823 Energy and Commerce
Barton, Joe Texas 6th District R 2107 RHOB 202-225-2002 Energy and Commerce
Bass, Karen California 37th District D 408 CHOB 202-225-7084 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
Beatty, Joyce Ohio 3rd District D 417 CHOB 202-225-4324 Financial Services
Becerra, Xavier California 34th District D 1226 LHOB 202-225-6235 Ways and Means
Benishek, Dan Michigan 1st District R 514 CHOB 202-225-4735 Agriculture
Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
Bentivolio, Kerry Michigan 11th District R 226 CHOB 202-225-8171 Oversight and Government
Small Business
Bera, Ami California 7th District D 1408 LHOB 202-225-5716 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
Bilirakis, Gus M. Florida 12th District R 2313 RHOB 202-225-5755 Energy and Commerce
Veterans’ Affairs
Bishop Jr., Sanford D. Georgia 2nd District D 2429 RHOB 202-225-3631 Appropriations
Bishop, Rob Utah 1st District R 123 CHOB 202-225-0453 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Rules
Bishop, Timothy New York 1st District D 306 CHOB 202-225-3826 Education and the Workforce
Transportation
Black, Diane Tennessee 6th District R 1531 LHOB 202-225-4231 the Budget
Ways and Means
Blackburn, Marsha Tennessee 7th District R 217 CHOB 202-225-2811 Energy and Commerce
the Budget
Blumenauer, Earl Oregon 3rd District D 1111 LHOB 202-225-4811 the Budget
Ways and Means
Boehner, John A. Ohio 8th District R 1011 LHOB 202-225-6205
Bonamici, Suzanne Oregon 1st District D 439 CHOB 202-225-0855 Education and the Workforce
Science, Space, and Technology
Bordallo, Madeleine Guam At-Large D 2441 RHOB 202-225-1188 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Boustany Jr., Charles W. Louisiana 3rd District R 1431 LHOB 202-225-2031 Ways and Means
Brady, Kevin Texas 8th District R 301 CHOB 202-225-4901 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
Brady, Robert Pennsylvania 1st District D 102 CHOB 202-225-4731 Armed Services
House Administration
Joint Library
Braley, Bruce L. Iowa 1st District D 2263 RHOB 202-225-2911 Energy and Commerce
Bridenstine, Jim Oklahoma 1st District R 216 CHOB 202-225-2211 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Brooks, Mo Alabama 5th District R 1230 LHOB 202-225-4801 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
Brooks, Susan W. Indiana 5th District R 1505 LHOB 202-225-2276 Education and the Workforce
Ethics
Homeland Security
Broun, Paul C. Georgia 10th District R 2437 RHOB 202-225-4101 Homeland Security
Natural Resources
Science, Space, and Technology
Brown, Corrine Florida 5th District D 2111 RHOB 202-225-0123 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
Brownley, Julia California 26th District D 1019 LHOB 202-225-5811 Science, Space, and Technology
Veterans’ Affairs
Buchanan, Vern Florida 16th District R 2104 RHOB 202-225-5015 Ways and Means
Bucshon, Larry Indiana 8th District R 1005 LHOB 202-225-4636 Education and the Workforce
Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
Burgess, Michael Texas 26th District R 2336 RHOB 202-225-7772 Energy and Commerce
Rules
Bustos, Cheri Illinois 17th District D 1009 LHOB 202-225-5905 Agriculture
Transportation
Butterfield, G.K. North Carolina 1st District D 2305 RHOB 202-225-3101 Energy and Commerce
Byrne,Bradley Alabama 1st District R 2236 RHOB 202-225-4931 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources

C

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Calvert, Ken California 42nd District R 2269 RHOB 202-225-1986 Appropriations
the Budget
Camp, Dave Michigan 4th District R 341 CHOB 202-225-3561 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
Campbell, John California 45th District R 2331 RHOB 202-225-5611 Financial Services
the Budget
Cantor, Eric Virginia 7th District R 303 CHOB 202-225-2815
Capito, Shelley Moore West Virginia 2nd District R 2366 RHOB 202-225-2711 Financial Services
Transportation
Capps, Lois California 24th District D 2231 RHOB 202-225-3601 Energy and Commerce
Capuano, Michael E. Massachusetts 7th District D 1414 LHOB 202-225-5111 Ethics
Financial Services
Transportation
Carney, John Delaware At-Large D 1406 LHOB 202-225-4165 Financial Services
Carson, André Indiana 7th District D 2453 RHOB 202-225-4011 Armed Services
Transportation
Carter, John Texas 31st District R 409 CHOB 202-225-3864 Appropriations
Cartwright, Matthew Pennsylvania 17th District D 1419 LHOB 202-225-5546 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
Cassidy, William Louisiana 6th District R 1131 LHOB 202-225-3901 Energy and Commerce
Castor, Kathy Florida 14th District D 205 CHOB 202-225-3376 Energy and Commerce
the Budget
Castro, Joaquin Texas 20th District D 212 CHOB 202-225-3236 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
Chabot, Steve Ohio 1st District R 2371 RHOB 202-225-2216 Foreign Affairs
Small Business
the Judiciary
Chaffetz, Jason Utah 3rd District R 2464 RHOB 202-225-7751 Homeland Security
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
Christensen, Donna M., Virgin Islands At-Large D 1510 LHOB 202-225-1790 Energy and Commerce
Chu, Judy California 27th District D 1520 LHOB 202-225-5464 Small Business
the Judiciary
Cicilline, David Rhode Island 1st District D 128 CHOB 202-225-4911 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
Clark, Katherine Massachusetts 5th District D 2108 RHOB 202-225-2836 Natural Resources
Science, Space, and Technology
Clarke, Yvette D. New York 9th District D 2351 RHOB 202-225-6231 Ethics
Homeland Security
Small Business
Clawson,Curt Florida 19th District R 1123 LHOB 202-225-2536
Clay Jr., William “Lacy” Missouri 1st District D 2418 RHOB 202-225-2406 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
Cleaver, Emanuel Missouri 5th District D 2335 RHOB 202-225-4535 Financial Services
Clyburn, James E. South Carolina 6th District D 242 CHOB 202-225-3315
Coble, Howard North Carolina 6th District R 2188 RHOB 202-225-3065 the Judiciary
Transportation
Coffman, Mike Colorado 6th District R 2443 RHOB 202-225-7882 Armed Services
Small Business
Veterans’ Affairs
Cohen, Steve Tennessee 9th District D 2404 RHOB 202-225-3265 the Judiciary
Transportation
Cole, Tom Oklahoma 4th District R 2458 RHOB 202-225-6165 Appropriations
Joint Library
Rules
the Budget
Collins, Chris New York 27th District R 1117 LHOB 202-225-5265 Agriculture
Science, Space, and Technology
Small Business
Collins, Doug Georgia 9th District R 513 CHOB 202-225-9893 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
Conaway, K. Michael Texas 11th District R 2430 RHOB 202-225-3605 Agriculture
Armed Services
Ethics
Intelligence (Permanent)
Connolly, Gerald E. “Gerry” Virginia 11th District D 424 CHOB 202-225-1492 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government
Conyers Jr., John Michigan 13th District D 2426 RHOB 202-225-5126 the Judiciary
Cook, Paul California 8th District R 1222 LHOB 202-225-5861 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
Veterans’ Affairs
Cooper, Jim Tennessee 5th District D 1536 LHOB 202-225-4311 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
Costa, Jim California 16th District D 1314 LHOB 202-225-3341 Agriculture
Natural Resources
Cotton, Tom Arkansas 4th District R 415 CHOB 202-225-3772 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
Courtney, Joe Connecticut 2nd District D 2348 RHOB 202-225-2076 Agriculture
Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Cramer, Kevin North Dakota At-Large R 1032 LHOB 202-225-2611 Natural Resources
Science, Space, and Technology
Crawford, Rick Arkansas 1st District R 1711 LHOB 202-225-4076 Agriculture
Transportation
Crenshaw, Ander Florida 4th District R 440 CHOB 202-225-2501 Appropriations
Crowley, Joseph New York 14th District D 1436 LHOB 202-225-3965 Ways and Means
Cuellar, Henry Texas 28th District D 2431 RHOB 202-225-1640 Appropriations
Culberson, John Texas 7th District R 2352 RHOB 202-225-2571 Appropriations
Cummings, Elijah Maryland 7th District D 2235 RHOB 202-225-4741 Oversight and Government
Transportation
Cárdenas, Tony California 29th District D 1508 LHOB 202-225-6131 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
the Budget

D

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Daines, Steve Montana At-Large R 206 CHOB 202-225-3211 Homeland Security
Natural Resources
Transportation
Davis, Danny K. Illinois 7th District D 2159 RHOB 202-225-5006 Oversight and Government
Ways and Means
Davis, Rodney Illinois 13th District R 1740 LHOB 202-225-2371 Agriculture
Transportation
Davis, Susan California 53rd District D 1526 LHOB 202-225-2040 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
DeFazio, Peter Oregon 4th District D 2134 RHOB 202-225-6416 Natural Resources
Transportation
DeGette, Diana Colorado 1st District D 2368 RHOB 202-225-4431 Energy and Commerce
DeLauro, Rosa L. Connecticut 3rd District D 2413 RHOB 202-225-3661 Appropriations
DeSantis, Ron Florida 6th District R 427 CHOB 202-225-2706 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
DelBene, Suzan Washington 1st District D 318 CHOB 202-225-6311 Agriculture
the Judiciary
Delaney, John Maryland 6th District D 1632 LHOB 202-225-2721 Financial Services
Denham, Jeff California 10th District R 1730 LHOB 202-225-4540 Agriculture
Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
Dent, Charles W. Pennsylvania 15th District R 2455 RHOB 202-225-6411 Appropriations
Ethics
DesJarlais, Scott Tennessee 4th District R 413 CHOB 202-225-6831 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce
Oversight and Government
Deutch, Ted Florida 21st District D 1024 LHOB 202-225-3001 Ethics
Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
Diaz-Balart, Mario Florida 25th District R 436 CHOB 202-225-4211 Appropriations
Dingell, John Michigan 12th District D 2328 RHOB 202-225-4071 Energy and Commerce
Doggett, Lloyd Texas 35th District D 201 CHOB 202-225-4865 the Budget
Ways and Means
Doyle, Mike Pennsylvania 14th District D 239 CHOB 202-225-2135 Energy and Commerce
Duckworth, Tammy Illinois 8th District D 104 CHOB 202-225-3711 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
Duffy, Sean P. Wisconsin 7th District R 1208 LHOB 202-225-3365 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
the Budget
Duncan Jr., John J. Tennessee 2nd District R 2207 RHOB 202-225-5435 Oversight and Government
Transportation
Duncan, Jeff South Carolina 3rd District R 116 CHOB 202-225-5301 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Natural Resources

E

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Edwards, Donna F. Maryland 4th District D 2445 RHOB 202-225-8699 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
Ellison, Keith Minnesota 5th District D 2244 RHOB 202-225-4755 Financial Services
Ellmers, Renee North Carolina 2nd District R 426 CHOB 202-225-4531 Energy and Commerce
Engel, Eliot New York 16th District D 2161 RHOB 202-225-2464 Energy and Commerce
Foreign Affairs
Enyart, William Illinois 12th District D 1722 LHOB 202-225-5661 Agriculture
Armed Services
Eshoo, Anna G. California 18th District D 241 CHOB 202-225-8104 Energy and Commerce
Esty, Elizabeth Connecticut 5th District D 509 CHOB 202-225-4476 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation

F

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Faleomavaega, Eni F. H. American Samoa At-Large D 2422 RHOB 202-225-8577 Foreign Affairs
Natural Resources
Farenthold, Blake Texas 27th District R 117 CHOB 202-225-7742 Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
Transportation
Farr, Sam California 20th District D 1126 LHOB 202-225-2861 Appropriations
Fattah, Chaka Pennsylvania 2nd District D 2301 RHOB 202-225-4001 Appropriations
Fincher, Stephen Tennessee 8th District R 1118 LHOB 202-225-4714 Agriculture
Financial Services
Fitzpatrick, Michael G. Pennsylvania 8th District R 2400 RHOB 202-225-4276 Financial Services
Fleischmann, Chuck Tennessee 3rd District R 230 CHOB 202-225-3271 Appropriations
Fleming, John Louisiana 4th District R 416 CHOB 202-225-2777 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Flores, Bill Texas 17th District R 1030 LHOB 202-225-6105 Natural Resources
the Budget
Veterans’ Affairs
Forbes, J. Randy Virginia 4th District R 2135 RHOB 202-225-6365 Armed Services
the Judiciary
Fortenberry, Jeff Nebraska 1st District R 1514 LHOB 202-225-4806 Appropriations
Foster, Bill Illinois 11th District D 1224 LHOB 202-225-3515 Financial Services
Foxx, Virginia North Carolina 5th District R 2350 RHOB 202-225-2071 Education and the Workforce
Rules
Frankel, Lois Florida 22nd District D 1037 LHOB 202-225-9890 Foreign Affairs
Transportation
Franks, Trent Arizona 8th District R 2435 RHOB 202-225-4576 Armed Services
the Judiciary
Frelinghuysen, Rodney New Jersey 11th District R 2306 RHOB 202-225-5034 Appropriations
Fudge, Marcia L. Ohio 11th District D 2344 RHOB 202-225-7032 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce

G

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Gabbard, Tulsi Hawaii 2nd District D 502 CHOB 202-225-4906 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
Gallego, Pete Texas 23rd District D 431 CHOB 202-225-4511 Agriculture
Armed Services
Garamendi, John California 3rd District D 2438 RHOB 202-225-1880 Agriculture
Armed Services
Transportation
Garcia, Joe Florida 26th District D 1440 LHOB 202-225-2778 Natural Resources
the Judiciary
Gardner, Cory Colorado 4th District R 213 CHOB 202-225-4676 Energy and Commerce
Garrett, Scott New Jersey 5th District R 2232 RHOB 202-225-4465 Financial Services
the Budget
Gerlach, Jim Pennsylvania 6th District R 2442 RHOB 202-225-4315 Ways and Means
Gibbs, Bob Ohio 7th District R 329 CHOB 202-225-6265 Agriculture
Transportation
Gibson, Chris New York 19th District R 1708 LHOB 202-225-5614 Agriculture
Armed Services
Gingrey, Phil Georgia 11th District R 442 CHOB 202-225-2931 Energy and Commerce
House Administration
Gohmert, Louie Texas 1st District R 2243 RHOB 202-225-3035 Natural Resources
the Judiciary
Goodlatte, Bob Virginia 6th District R 2309 RHOB 202-225-5431 Agriculture
the Judiciary
Gosar, Paul A. Arizona 4th District R 504 CHOB 202-225-2315 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
Gowdy, Trey South Carolina 4th District R 1404 LHOB 202-225-6030 Ethics
Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
Granger, Kay Texas 12th District R 1026 LHOB 202-225-5071 Appropriations
Graves, Sam Missouri 6th District R 1415 LHOB 202-225-7041 Small Business
Transportation
Graves, Tom Georgia 14th District R 432 CHOB 202-225-5211 Appropriations
Grayson, Alan Florida 9th District D 430 CHOB 202-225-9889 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
Green, Al Texas 9th District D 2201 RHOB 202-225-7508 Financial Services
Green, Gene Texas 29th District D 2470 RHOB 202-225-1688 Energy and Commerce
Griffin, Tim Arkansas 2nd District R 1232 LHOB 202-225-2506 Ways and Means
Griffith, Morgan Virginia 9th District R 1108 LHOB 202-225-3861 Energy and Commerce
Grijalva, Raul Arizona 3rd District D 1511 LHOB 202-225-2435 Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources
Grimm, Michael New York 11th District R 512 CHOB 202-225-3371
Guthrie, S. Brett Kentucky 2nd District R 308 CHOB 202-225-3501 Education and the Workforce
Energy and Commerce
Gutierrez, Luis Illinois 4th District D 2408 RHOB 202-225-8203 Intelligence (Permanent)
the Judiciary

H

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Hahn, Janice California 44th District D 404 CHOB 202-225-8220 Small Business
Transportation
Hall, Ralph M. Texas 4th District R 2405 RHOB 202-225-6673 Energy and Commerce
Science, Space, and Technology
Hanabusa, Colleen Hawaii 1st District D 238 CHOB 202-225-2726 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Hanna, Richard New York 22nd District R 319 CHOB 202-225-3665 Small Business
Transportation
Harper, Gregg Mississippi 3rd District R 307 CHOB 202-225-5031 Energy and Commerce
House Administration
Joint Library
Harris, Andy Maryland 1st District R 1533 LHOB 202-225-5311 Appropriations
Hartzler, Vicky Missouri 4th District R 1023 LHOB 202-225-2876 Agriculture
Armed Services
the Budget
Hastings, Alcee L. Florida 20th District D 2353 RHOB 202-225-1313 Rules
Hastings, Doc Washington 4th District R 1203 LHOB 202-225-5816 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
Heck, Denny Washington 10th District D 425 CHOB 202-225-9740 Financial Services
Heck, Joe Nevada 3rd District R 132 CHOB 202-225-3252 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Intelligence (Permanent)
Hensarling, Jeb Texas 5th District R 2228 RHOB 202-225-3484 Financial Services
Herrera Beutler, Jaime Washington 3rd District R 1130 LHOB 202-225-3536 Appropriations
Small Business
Higgins, Brian New York 26th District D 2459 RHOB 202-225-3306 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Himes, Jim Connecticut 4th District D 119 CHOB 202-225-5541 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Hinojosa, Rubén Texas 15th District D 2262 RHOB 202-225-2531 Education and the Workforce
Financial Services
Holding, George North Carolina 13th District R 507 CHOB 202-225-3032 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
Holt, Rush New Jersey 12th District D 1214 LHOB 202-225-5801 Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources
Honda, Mike California 17th District D 1713 LHOB 202-225-2631 Appropriations
Horsford, Steven Nevada 4th District D 1330 LHOB 202-225-9894 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
Hoyer, Steny H. Maryland 5th District D 1705 LHOB 202-225-4131
Hudson, Richard North Carolina 8th District R 429 CHOB 202-225-3715 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce
Homeland Security
Huelskamp, Tim Kansas 1st District R 129 CHOB 202-225-2715 Small Business
Veterans’ Affairs
Huffman, Jared California 2nd District D 1630 LHOB 202-225-5161 Natural Resources
the Budget
Huizenga, Bill Michigan 2nd District R 1217 LHOB 202-225-4401 Financial Services
Hultgren, Randy Illinois 14th District R 332 CHOB 202-225-2976 Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Hunter, Duncan D. California 50th District R 223 CHOB 202-225-5672 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Transportation
Hurt, Robert Virginia 5th District R 125 CHOB 202-225-4711 Financial Services

I

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Israel, Steve New York 3rd District D 2457 RHOB 202-225-3335
Issa, Darrell California 49th District R 2347 RHOB 202-225-3906 Oversight and Government
the Judiciary

J

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Jackson Lee, Sheila Texas 18th District D 2160 RHOB 202-225-3816 Homeland Security
the Judiciary
Jeffries, Hakeem New York 8th District D 1339 LHOB 202-225-5936 the Budget
the Judiciary
Jenkins, Lynn Kansas 2nd District R 1027 LHOB 202-225-6601 Ways and Means
Johnson, Bill Ohio 6th District R 1710 LHOB 202-225-5705 Energy and Commerce
Science, Space, and Technology
Johnson, Eddie Bernice Texas 30th District D 2468 RHOB 202-225-8885 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
Johnson, Henry C. “Hank” Jr. Georgia 4th District D 2240 RHOB 202-225-1605 Armed Services
the Judiciary
Johnson, Sam Texas 3rd District R 1211 LHOB 202-225-4201 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
Jolly, David Florida 13th District R 2407 RHOB 202-225-5961 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
Jones, Walter B. North Carolina 3rd District R 2333 RHOB 202-225-3415 Armed Services
Jordan, Jim Ohio 4th District R 1524 LHOB 202-225-2676 Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
Joyce, David Ohio 14th District R 1535 LHOB 202-225-5731 Appropriations

K

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Kaptur, Marcy Ohio 9th District D 2186 RHOB 202-225-4146 Appropriations
Keating, William Massachusetts 9th District D 315 CHOB 202-225-3111 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Kelly, Mike Pennsylvania 3rd District R 1519 LHOB 202-225-5406 Education and the Workforce
Ways and Means
Kelly, Robin Illinois 2nd District D 2419 RHOB 202-225-0773 Oversight and Government
Science, Space, and Technology
Kennedy III, Joseph P. Massachusetts 4th District D 1218 LHOB 202-225-5931 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
Kildee, Daniel Michigan 5th District D 327 CHOB 202-225-3611 Financial Services
the Budget
Kilmer, Derek Washington 6th District D 1429 LHOB 202-225-5916 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Kind, Ron Wisconsin 3rd District D 1502 LHOB 202-225-5506 Ways and Means
King, Pete New York 2nd District R 339 CHOB 202-225-7896 Financial Services
Homeland Security
Intelligence (Permanent)
King, Steve Iowa 4th District R 2210 RHOB 202-225-4426 Agriculture
Small Business
the Judiciary
Kingston, Jack Georgia 1st District R 2372 RHOB 202-225-5831 Appropriations
Kinzinger, Adam Illinois 16th District R 1221 LHOB 202-225-3635 Energy and Commerce
Foreign Affairs
Kirkpatrick, Ann Arizona 1st District D 330 CHOB 202-225-3361 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
Kline, John Minnesota 2nd District R 2439 RHOB 202-225-2271 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Kuster, Ann New Hampshire 2nd District D 137 CHOB 202-225-5206 Agriculture
Small Business
Veterans’ Affairs

L

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
LaMalfa, Doug California 1st District R 506 CHOB 202-225-3076 Agriculture
Natural Resources
Labrador, Raul R. Idaho 1st District R 1523 LHOB 202-225-6611 Natural Resources
the Judiciary
Lamborn, Doug Colorado 5th District R 2402 RHOB 202-225-4422 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
Lance, Leonard New Jersey 7th District R 133 CHOB 202-225-5361 Energy and Commerce
Langevin, Jim Rhode Island 2nd District D 109 CHOB 202-225-2735 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Lankford, James Oklahoma 5th District R 228 CHOB 202-225-2132 Oversight and Government
the Budget
Larsen, Rick Washington 2nd District D 2113 RHOB 202-225-2605 Armed Services
Transportation
Larson, John B. Connecticut 1st District D 1501 LHOB 202-225-2265 Ways and Means
Latham, Tom Iowa 3rd District R 2217 RHOB 202-225-5476 Appropriations
Latta, Robert E. Ohio 5th District R 2448 RHOB 202-225-6405 Energy and Commerce
Lee, Barbara California 13th District D 2267 RHOB 202-225-2661 Appropriations
the Budget
Levin, Sander Michigan 9th District D 1236 LHOB 202-225-4961 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
Lewis, John Georgia 5th District D 343 CHOB 202-225-3801 Ways and Means
Lipinski, Daniel Illinois 3rd District D 1717 LHOB 202-225-5701 Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
LoBiondo, Frank New Jersey 2nd District R 2427 RHOB 202-225-6572 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Transportation
Loebsack, David Iowa 2nd District D 1527 LHOB 202-225-6576 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Lofgren, Zoe California 19th District D 1401 LHOB 202-225-3072 House Administration
Joint Library
Science, Space, and Technology
the Judiciary
Long, Billy Missouri 7th District R 1541 LHOB 202-225-6536 Energy and Commerce
Lowenthal, Alan California 47th District D 515 CHOB 202-225-7924 Foreign Affairs
Natural Resources
Lowey, Nita New York 17th District D 2365 RHOB 202-225-6506 Appropriations
Lucas, Frank Oklahoma 3rd District R 2311 RHOB 202-225-5565 Agriculture
Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Luetkemeyer, Blaine Missouri 3rd District R 2440 RHOB 202-225-2956 Financial Services
Small Business
Lujan Grisham, Michelle New Mexico 1st District D 214 CHOB 202-225-6316 Agriculture
Oversight and Government
the Budget
Lujan, Ben R. New Mexico 3rd District D 2446 RHOB 202-225-6190 Energy and Commerce
Lummis, Cynthia M. Wyoming At-Large R 113 CHOB 202-225-2311 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
Science, Space, and Technology
Lynch, Stephen F. Massachusetts 8th District D 2133 RHOB 202-225-8273 Financial Services
Oversight and Government

M

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Maffei, Daniel New York 24th District D 422 CHOB 202-225-3701 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Maloney, Carolyn New York 12th District D 2308 RHOB 202-225-7944 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
Maloney, Sean Patrick New York 18th District D 1529 LHOB 202-225-5441 Agriculture
Transportation
Marchant, Kenny Texas 24th District R 1110 LHOB 202-225-6605 Education and the Workforce
Ways and Means
Marino, Tom Pennsylvania 10th District R 410 CHOB 202-225-3731 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
the Judiciary
Massie, Thomas Kentucky 4th District R 314 CHOB 202-225-3465 Oversight and Government
Science, Space, and Technology
Transportation
Matheson, Jim Utah 4th District D 2211 RHOB 202-225-3011 Energy and Commerce
Matsui, Doris O. California 6th District D 2434 RHOB 202-225-7163 Energy and Commerce
McAllister, Vance Louisiana 5th District R 316 CHOB 202-225-8490 Agriculture
Natural Resources
McCarthy, Carolyn New York 4th District D 2346 RHOB 202-225-5516 Education and the Workforce
Financial Services
McCarthy, Kevin California 23rd District R 2421 RHOB 202-225-2915 Financial Services
McCaul, Michael T. Texas 10th District R 131 CHOB 202-225-2401 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology
McClintock, Tom California 4th District R 434 CHOB 202-225-2511 Natural Resources
the Budget
McCollum, Betty Minnesota 4th District D 1714 LHOB 202-225-6631 Appropriations
McDermott, Jim Washington 7th District D 1035 LHOB 202-225-3106 the Budget
Ways and Means
McGovern, James Massachusetts 2nd District D 438 CHOB 202-225-6101 Agriculture
Rules
McHenry, Patrick T. North Carolina 10th District R 2334 RHOB 202-225-2576 Financial Services
Oversight and Government
McIntyre, Mike North Carolina 7th District D 2428 RHOB 202-225-2731 Agriculture
Armed Services
McKeon, Buck California 25th District R 2310 RHOB 202-225-1956 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
McKinley, David West Virginia 1st District R 412 CHOB 202-225-4172 Energy and Commerce
McMorris Rodgers, Cathy Washington 5th District R 203 CHOB 202-225-2006 Energy and Commerce
McNerney, Jerry California 9th District D 1210 LHOB 202-225-1947 Energy and Commerce
Meadows, Mark North Carolina 11th District R 1516 LHOB 202-225-6401 Foreign Affairs
Oversight and Government
Transportation
Meehan, Pat Pennsylvania 7th District R 204 CHOB 202-225-2011 Ethics
Homeland Security
Oversight and Government
Transportation
Meeks, Gregory W. New York 5th District D 2234 RHOB 202-225-3461 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
Meng, Grace New York 6th District D 1317 LHOB 202-225-2601 Foreign Affairs
Small Business
Messer, Luke Indiana 6th District R 508 CHOB 202-225-3021 Education and the Workforce
Financial Services
Mica, John Florida 7th District R 2187 RHOB 202-225-4035 Oversight and Government
Transportation
Michaud, Michael Maine 2nd District D 1724 LHOB 202-225-6306 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
Miller, Candice Michigan 10th District R 320 CHOB 202-225-2106 Homeland Security
House Administration
Joint Library
Transportation
Miller, Gary California 31st District R 2467 RHOB 202-225-3201 Financial Services
Transportation
Miller, George California 11th District D 2205 RHOB 202-225-2095 Education and the Workforce
Miller, Jeff Florida 1st District R 336 CHOB 202-225-4136 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Veterans’ Affairs
Moore, Gwen Wisconsin 4th District D 2245 RHOB 202-225-4572 Financial Services
the Budget
Moran, James Virginia 8th District D 2252 RHOB 202-225-4376 Appropriations
Mullin, Markwayne Oklahoma 2nd District R 1113 LHOB 202-225-2701 Natural Resources
Transportation
Mulvaney, Mick South Carolina 5th District R 1207 LHOB 202-225-5501 Financial Services
Small Business
Murphy, Patrick Florida 18th District D 1517 LHOB 202-225-3026 Financial Services
Small Business
Murphy, Tim Pennsylvania 18th District R 2332 RHOB 202-225-2301 Energy and Commerce

N

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Nadler, Jerrold New York 10th District D 2110 RHOB 202-225-5635 the Judiciary
Transportation
Napolitano, Grace California 32nd District D 1610 LHOB 202-225-5256 Natural Resources
Transportation
Neal, Richard E. Massachusetts 1st District D 2208 RHOB 202-225-5601 Ways and Means
Negrete McLeod, Gloria California 35th District D 1641 LHOB 202-225-6161 Agriculture
Veterans’ Affairs
Neugebauer, Randy Texas 19th District R 1424 LHOB 202-225-4005 Agriculture
Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Noem, Kristi South Dakota At-Large R 1323 LHOB 202-225-2801 Agriculture
Armed Services
Nolan, Rick Minnesota 8th District D 2447 RHOB 202-225-6211 Agriculture
Transportation
Norton, Eleanor Holmes District of Columbia At-Large D 2136 RHOB 202-225-8050 Oversight and Government
Transportation
Nugent, Richard Florida 11th District R 1727 LHOB 202-225-1002 Armed Services
House Administration
Rules
Nunes, Devin California 22nd District R 1013 LHOB 202-225-2523 Intelligence (Permanent)
Ways and Means
Nunnelee, Alan Mississippi 1st District R 1427 LHOB 202-225-4306 Appropriations
the Budget

O

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
O’Rourke, Beto Texas 16th District D 1721 LHOB 202-225-4831 Homeland Security
Veterans’ Affairs
Olson, Pete Texas 22nd District R 312 CHOB 202-225-5951 Energy and Commerce
Owens, Bill New York 21st District D 405 CHOB 202-225-4611 Appropriations

P

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Palazzo, Steven Mississippi 4th District R 331 CHOB 202-225-5772 Armed Services
Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology
Pallone Jr., Frank New Jersey 6th District D 237 CHOB 202-225-4671 Energy and Commerce
Natural Resources
Pascrell Jr., Bill New Jersey 9th District D 2370 RHOB 202-225-5751 the Budget
Ways and Means
Pastor, Ed Arizona 7th District D 2465 RHOB 202-225-4065 Appropriations
Intelligence (Permanent)
Paulsen, Erik Minnesota 3rd District R 127 CHOB 202-225-2871 Ways and Means
Payne Jr., Donald New Jersey 10th District D 103 CHOB 202-225-3436 Homeland Security
Small Business
Pearce, Steve New Mexico 2nd District R 2432 RHOB 202-225-2365 Financial Services
Pelosi, Nancy California 12th District D 235 CHOB 202-225-4965
Perlmutter, Ed Colorado 7th District D 1410 LHOB 202-225-2645 Financial Services
Perry, Scott Pennsylvania 4th District R 126 CHOB 202-225-5836 Foreign Affairs
Homeland Security
Transportation
Peters, Gary Michigan 14th District D 1609 LHOB 202-225-5802 Financial Services
Peters, Scott California 52nd District D 2410 RHOB 202-225-0508 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Peterson, Collin C. Minnesota 7th District D 2109 RHOB 202-225-2165 Agriculture
Petri, Thomas Wisconsin 6th District R 2462 RHOB 202-225-2476 Education and the Workforce
Transportation
Pierluisi, Pedro Puerto Rico At-Large D 1213 LHOB 202-225-2615 Ethics
Natural Resources
the Judiciary
Pingree, Chellie Maine 1st District D 1318 LHOB 202-225-6116 Appropriations
Pittenger, Robert North Carolina 9th District R 224 CHOB 202-225-1976 Financial Services
Pitts, Joseph R. Pennsylvania 16th District R 420 CHOB 202-225-2411 Energy and Commerce
Pocan, Mark Wisconsin 2nd District D 313 CHOB 202-225-2906 Education and the Workforce
the Budget
Poe, Ted Texas 2nd District R 2412 RHOB 202-225-6565 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
Polis, Jared Colorado 2nd District D 1433 LHOB 202-225-2161 Education and the Workforce
Rules
Pompeo, Mike Kansas 4th District R 107 CHOB 202-225-6216 Energy and Commerce
Intelligence (Permanent)
Posey, Bill Florida 8th District R 120 CHOB 202-225-3671 Financial Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Price, David North Carolina 4th District D 2162 RHOB 202-225-1784 Appropriations
Price, Tom Georgia 6th District R 100 CHOB 202-225-4501 Education and the Workforce
the Budget
Ways and Means

Q

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Quigley, Mike Illinois 5th District D 1124 LHOB 202-225-4061 Appropriations

R

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Rahall, Nick West Virginia 3rd District D 2307 RHOB 202-225-3452 Transportation
Rangel, Charles B. New York 13th District D 2354 RHOB 202-225-4365 Joint Taxation
Ways and Means
Reed, Tom New York 23rd District R 1504 LHOB 202-225-3161 Ways and Means
Reichert, David G. Washington 8th District R 1127 LHOB 202-225-7761 Ways and Means
Renacci, Jim Ohio 16th District R 130 CHOB 202-225-3876 Ways and Means
Ribble, Reid Wisconsin 8th District R 1513 LHOB 202-225-5665 Agriculture
the Budget
Transportation
Rice, Tom South Carolina 7th District R 325 CHOB 202-225-9895 Small Business
the Budget
Transportation
Richmond, Cedric Louisiana 2nd District D 240 CHOB 202-225-6636 Homeland Security
the Judiciary
Rigell, Scott Virginia 2nd District R 418 CHOB 202-225-4215 Armed Services
the Budget
Roby, Martha Alabama 2nd District R 428 CHOB 202-225-2901 Appropriations
Roe, Phil Tennessee 1st District R 407 CHOB 202-225-6356 Education and the Workforce
Veterans’ Affairs
Rogers (AL), Mike Alabama 3rd District R 324 CHOB 202-225-3261 Agriculture
Armed Services
Homeland Security
Rogers (MI), Mike Michigan 8th District R 2112 RHOB 202-225-4872 Energy and Commerce
Intelligence (Permanent)
Rogers, Harold Kentucky 5th District R 2406 RHOB 202-225-4601 Appropriations
Rohrabacher, Dana California 48th District R 2300 RHOB 202-225-2415 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
Rokita, Todd Indiana 4th District R 236 CHOB 202-225-5037 Education and the Workforce
House Administration
the Budget
Rooney, Tom Florida 17th District R 221 CHOB 202-225-5792 Appropriations
Intelligence (Permanent)
Ros-Lehtinen, Ileana Florida 27th District R 2206 RHOB 202-225-3931 Foreign Affairs
Rules
Roskam, Peter J. Illinois 6th District R 227 CHOB 202-225-4561 Ways and Means
Ross, Dennis Florida 15th District R 229 CHOB 202-225-1252 Financial Services
Rothfus, Keith Pennsylvania 12th District R 503 CHOB 202-225-2065 Financial Services
Roybal-Allard, Lucille California 40th District D 2330 RHOB 202-225-1766 Appropriations
Royce, Ed California 39th District R 2185 RHOB 202-225-4111 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
Ruiz, Raul California 36th District D 1319 LHOB 202-225-5330 Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
Runyan, Jon New Jersey 3rd District R 1239 LHOB 202-225-4765 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
Ruppersberger, Dutch Maryland 2nd District D 2416 RHOB 202-225-3061 Intelligence (Permanent)
Rush, Bobby L. Illinois 1st District D 2268 RHOB 202-225-4372 Energy and Commerce
Ryan, Paul Wisconsin 1st District R 1233 LHOB 202-225-3031 the Budget
Ways and Means
Ryan, Tim Ohio 13th District D 1421 LHOB 202-225-5261 Appropriations
the Budget

S

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Sablan, Gregorio Northern Mariana Islands At-Large D 423 CHOB 202-225-2646 Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources
Salmon, Matt Arizona 5th District R 2349 RHOB 202-225-2635 Education and the Workforce
Foreign Affairs
Sanchez, Linda California 38th District D 2423 RHOB 202-225-6676 Ethics
Ways and Means
Sanchez, Loretta California 46th District D 1114 LHOB 202-225-2965 Armed Services
Homeland Security
Sanford, Mark South Carolina 1st District R 322 CHOB 202-225-3176 Homeland Security
Transportation
Sarbanes, John P. Maryland 3rd District D 2444 RHOB 202-225-4016 Energy and Commerce
Scalise, Steve Louisiana 1st District R 2338 RHOB 202-225-3015 Energy and Commerce
Schakowsky, Jan Illinois 9th District D 2367 RHOB 202-225-2111 Energy and Commerce
Intelligence (Permanent)
Schiff, Adam California 28th District D 2411 RHOB 202-225-4176 Appropriations
Intelligence (Permanent)
Schneider, Brad Illinois 10th District D 317 CHOB 202-225-4835 Foreign Affairs
Small Business
Schock, Aaron Illinois 18th District R 328 CHOB 202-225-6201 House Administration
Ways and Means
Schrader, Kurt Oregon 5th District D 108 CHOB 202-225-5711 Agriculture
Small Business
the Budget
Schwartz, Allyson Y. Pennsylvania 13th District D 1227 LHOB 202-225-6111 Ways and Means
Schweikert, David Arizona 6th District R 1205 LHOB 202-225-2190 Science, Space, and Technology
Small Business
Scott, Austin Georgia 8th District R 516 CHOB 202-225-6531 Agriculture
Armed Services
Scott, David Georgia 13th District D 225 CHOB 202-225-2939 Agriculture
Financial Services
Scott, Robert C. Virginia 3rd District D 1201 LHOB 202-225-8351 Education and the Workforce
the Judiciary
Sensenbrenner, F. James Wisconsin 5th District R 2449 RHOB 202-225-5101 Science, Space, and Technology
the Judiciary
Serrano, José E. New York 15th District D 2227 RHOB 202-225-4361 Appropriations
Sessions, Pete Texas 32nd District R 2233 RHOB 202-225-2231 Rules
Sewell, Terri A. Alabama 7th District D 1133 LHOB 202-225-2665 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Shea-Porter, Carol New Hampshire 1st District D 1530 LHOB 202-225-5456 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Sherman, Brad California 30th District D 2242 RHOB 202-225-5911 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
Shimkus, John Illinois 15th District R 2452 RHOB 202-225-5271 Energy and Commerce
Shuster, Bill Pennsylvania 9th District R 2209 RHOB 202-225-2431 Armed Services
Transportation
Simpson, Mike Idaho 2nd District R 2312 RHOB 202-225-5531 Appropriations
Sinema, Kyrsten Arizona 9th District D 1237 LHOB 202-225-9888 Financial Services
Sires, Albio New Jersey 8th District D 2342 RHOB 202-225-7919 Foreign Affairs
Transportation
Slaughter, Louise New York 25th District D 2469 RHOB 202-225-3615 Rules
Smith, Adam Washington 9th District D 2264 RHOB 202-225-8901 Armed Services
Smith, Adrian Nebraska 3rd District R 2241 RHOB 202-225-6435 Ways and Means
Smith, Chris New Jersey 4th District R 2373 RHOB 202-225-3765 Foreign Affairs
Smith, Jason Missouri 8th District R 2230 RHOB 202-225-4404 Natural Resources
the Judiciary
Smith, Lamar Texas 21st District R 2409 RHOB 202-225-4236 Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology
the Judiciary
Southerland, Steve Florida 2nd District R 1229 LHOB 202-225-5235 Natural Resources
Transportation
Speier, Jackie California 14th District D 211 CHOB 202-225-3531 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
Stewart, Chris Utah 2nd District R 323 CHOB 202-225-9730 Appropriations
Stivers, Steve Ohio 15th District R 1022 LHOB 202-225-2015 Financial Services
Stockman, Steve Texas 36th District R 326 CHOB 202-225-1555 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
Stutzman, Marlin Indiana 3rd District R 1728 LHOB 202-225-4436 Financial Services
Swalwell, Eric California 15th District D 501 CHOB 202-225-5065 Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology

T

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Takano, Mark California 41st District D 1507 LHOB 202-225-2305 Education and the Workforce
Veterans’ Affairs
Terry, Lee Nebraska 2nd District R 2266 RHOB 202-225-4155 Energy and Commerce
Thompson, Bennie G. Mississippi 2nd District D 2466 RHOB 202-225-5876 Homeland Security
Thompson, Glenn W. Pennsylvania 5th District R 124 CHOB 202-225-5121 Agriculture
Education and the Workforce
Natural Resources
Thompson, Mike California 5th District D 231 CHOB 202-225-3311 Intelligence (Permanent)
Ways and Means
Thornberry, Mac Texas 13th District R 2329 RHOB 202-225-3706 Armed Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Tiberi, Pat Ohio 12th District R 106 CHOB 202-225-5355 Ways and Means
Tierney, John Massachusetts 6th District D 2238 RHOB 202-225-8020 Education and the Workforce
Oversight and Government
Tipton, Scott Colorado 3rd District R 218 CHOB 202-225-4761 Agriculture
Natural Resources
Small Business
Titus, Dina Nevada 1st District D 401 CHOB 202-225-5965 Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
Tonko, Paul D. New York 20th District D 2463 RHOB 202-225-5076 Energy and Commerce
Tsongas, Niki Massachusetts 3rd District D 1607 LHOB 202-225-3411 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Turner, Michael Ohio 10th District R 2239 RHOB 202-225-6465 Armed Services
Oversight and Government

U

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Upton, Fred Michigan 6th District R 2183 RHOB 202-225-3761 Energy and Commerce

V

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Valadao, David California 21st District R 1004 LHOB 202-225-4695 Appropriations
Van Hollen, Chris Maryland 8th District D 1707 LHOB 202-225-5341 the Budget
Vargas, Juan California 51st District D 1605 LHOB 202-225-8045 Agriculture
Foreign Affairs
House Administration
Veasey, Marc Texas 33rd District D 414 CHOB 202-225-9897 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
Vela, Filemon Texas 34th District D 437 CHOB 202-225-9901 Agriculture
Homeland Security
Velázquez, Nydia M. New York 7th District D 2302 RHOB 202-225-2361 Financial Services
Small Business
Visclosky, Peter Indiana 1st District D 2256 RHOB 202-225-2461 Appropriations

W

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Wagner, Ann Missouri 2nd District R 435 CHOB 202-225-1621 Financial Services
Walberg, Tim Michigan 7th District R 2436 RHOB 202-225-6276 Education and the Workforce
Oversight and Government
Walden, Greg Oregon 2nd District R 2182 RHOB 202-225-6730 Energy and Commerce
Walorski, Jackie Indiana 2nd District R 419 CHOB 202-225-3915 Armed Services
the Budget
Veterans’ Affairs
Walz, Timothy J. Minnesota 1st District D 1034 LHOB 202-225-2472 Agriculture
Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
Wasserman Schultz, Debbie Florida 23rd District D 118 CHOB 202-225-7931 Appropriations
Waters, Maxine California 43rd District D 2221 RHOB 202-225-2201 Financial Services
Watt, Mel Vacancy North Carolina 12th District D 2304 RHOB 202-225-1510
Waxman, Henry California 33rd District D 2204 RHOB 202-225-3976 Energy and Commerce
Weber, Randy Texas 14th District R 510 CHOB 202-225-2831 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
Webster, Daniel Florida 10th District R 1039 LHOB 202-225-2176 Rules
Transportation
Welch, Peter Vermont At-Large D 2303 RHOB 202-225-4115 Energy and Commerce
Oversight and Government
Wenstrup, Brad Ohio 2nd District R 1223 LHOB 202-225-3164 Armed Services
Veterans’ Affairs
Westmoreland, Lynn A. Georgia 3rd District R 2433 RHOB 202-225-5901 Financial Services
Intelligence (Permanent)
Whitfield, Ed Kentucky 1st District R 2184 RHOB 202-225-3115 Energy and Commerce
Williams, Roger Texas 25th District R 1122 LHOB 202-225-9896 the Budget
Transportation
Wilson, Frederica Florida 24th District D 208 CHOB 202-225-4506 Education and the Workforce
Science, Space, and Technology
Wilson, Joe South Carolina 2nd District R 2229 RHOB 202-225-2452 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Foreign Affairs
Wittman, Robert J. Virginia 1st District R 2454 RHOB 202-225-4261 Armed Services
Natural Resources
Wolf, Frank Virginia 10th District R 233 CHOB 202-225-5136 Appropriations
Womack, Steve Arkansas 3rd District R 1119 LHOB 202-225-4301 Appropriations
Woodall, Robert Georgia 7th District R 1725 LHOB 202-225-4272 Oversight and Government
Rules
the Budget

Y

Name District Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
Yarmuth, John A. Kentucky 3rd District D 403 CHOB 202-225-5401 Energy and Commerce
the Budget
Yoder, Kevin Kansas 3rd District R 215 CHOB 202-225-2865 Appropriations
Yoho, Ted Florida 3rd District R 511 CHOB 202-225-5744 Agriculture
Foreign Affairs
Young, Don Alaska At-Large R 2314 RHOB 202-225-5765 Natural Resources
Transportation
Young, Todd Indiana 9th District R 1007 LHOB 202-225-5315 Ways and Means

A Note About Room Numbering

The three primary House office buildings—Cannon, Longworth and Rayburn—share a room numbering system for above-ground rooms that might confuse visitors at first.  The system is fairly straight forward and can be used to identify most member and committee offices merely by knowing the correct room number regardless of building.

All Cannon above-ground rooms are three digits.  As you would expect, the first digit indicates the floor level.  For example, 303 Cannon is on the 3rd floor.

All above-ground Longworth rooms are four digits and start with the number 1.  The second digit from the left indicates the floor.  For example, 1309 is on the third floor of the Longworth building.

All above-ground Rayburn rooms are also four digits, but start with a 2. The second digit indicates the floor number. For example, 2125 is on the first floor of Rayburn.

07-10-14 HOW TO CONTACT YOUR CALIFORNIA CONGRESSMEN AND WOMEN

http://www.house.gov/representatives/#state_ca

California

District Name Party Room Phone Committee Assignment
1 LaMalfa, Doug R 506 CHOB 202-225-3076 Agriculture
Natural Resources
2 Huffman, Jared D 1630 LHOB 202-225-5161 Natural Resources
the Budget
3 Garamendi, John D 2438 RHOB 202-225-1880 Agriculture
Armed Services
Transportation
4 McClintock, Tom R 434 CHOB 202-225-2511 Natural Resources
the Budget
5 Thompson, Mike D 231 CHOB 202-225-3311 Intelligence (Permanent)
Ways and Means
6 Matsui, Doris O. D 2434 RHOB 202-225-7163 Energy and Commerce
7 Bera, Ami D 1408 LHOB 202-225-5716 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
8 Cook, Paul R 1222 LHOB 202-225-5861 Armed Services
Foreign Affairs
Veterans’ Affairs
9 McNerney, Jerry D 1210 LHOB 202-225-1947 Energy and Commerce
10 Denham, Jeff R 1730 LHOB 202-225-4540 Agriculture
Transportation
Veterans’ Affairs
11 Miller, George D 2205 RHOB 202-225-2095 Education and the Workforce
12 Pelosi, Nancy D 235 CHOB 202-225-4965
13 Lee, Barbara D 2267 RHOB 202-225-2661 Appropriations
the Budget
14 Speier, Jackie D 211 CHOB 202-225-3531 Armed Services
Oversight and Government
15 Swalwell, Eric D 501 CHOB 202-225-5065 Homeland Security
Science, Space, and Technology
16 Costa, Jim D 1314 LHOB 202-225-3341 Agriculture
Natural Resources
17 Honda, Mike D 1713 LHOB 202-225-2631 Appropriations
18 Eshoo, Anna G. D 241 CHOB 202-225-8104 Energy and Commerce
19 Lofgren, Zoe D 1401 LHOB 202-225-3072 House Administration
Joint Library
Science, Space, and Technology
the Judiciary
20 Farr, Sam D 1126 LHOB 202-225-2861 Appropriations
21 Valadao, David R 1004 LHOB 202-225-4695 Appropriations
22 Nunes, Devin R 1013 LHOB 202-225-2523 Intelligence (Permanent)
Ways and Means
23 McCarthy, Kevin R 2421 RHOB 202-225-2915 Financial Services
24 Capps, Lois D 2231 RHOB 202-225-3601 Energy and Commerce
25 McKeon, Buck R 2310 RHOB 202-225-1956 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
26 Brownley, Julia D 1019 LHOB 202-225-5811 Science, Space, and Technology
Veterans’ Affairs
27 Chu, Judy D 1520 LHOB 202-225-5464 Small Business
the Judiciary
28 Schiff, Adam D 2411 RHOB 202-225-4176 Appropriations
Intelligence (Permanent)
29 Cárdenas, Tony D 1508 LHOB 202-225-6131 Natural Resources
Oversight and Government
the Budget
30 Sherman, Brad D 2242 RHOB 202-225-5911 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
31 Miller, Gary R 2467 RHOB 202-225-3201 Financial Services
Transportation
32 Napolitano, Grace D 1610 LHOB 202-225-5256 Natural Resources
Transportation
33 Waxman, Henry D 2204 RHOB 202-225-3976 Energy and Commerce
34 Becerra, Xavier D 1226 LHOB 202-225-6235 Ways and Means
35 Negrete McLeod, Gloria D 1641 LHOB 202-225-6161 Agriculture
Veterans’ Affairs
36 Ruiz, Raul D 1319 LHOB 202-225-5330 Natural Resources
Veterans’ Affairs
37 Bass, Karen D 408 CHOB 202-225-7084 Foreign Affairs
the Judiciary
38 Sanchez, Linda D 2423 RHOB 202-225-6676 Ethics
Ways and Means
39 Royce, Ed R 2185 RHOB 202-225-4111 Financial Services
Foreign Affairs
40 Roybal-Allard, Lucille D 2330 RHOB 202-225-1766 Appropriations
41 Takano, Mark D 1507 LHOB 202-225-2305 Education and the Workforce
Veterans’ Affairs
42 Calvert, Ken R 2269 RHOB 202-225-1986 Appropriations
the Budget
43 Waters, Maxine D 2221 RHOB 202-225-2201 Financial Services
44 Hahn, Janice D 404 CHOB 202-225-8220 Small Business
Transportation
45 Campbell, John R 2331 RHOB 202-225-5611 Financial Services
the Budget
46 Sanchez, Loretta D 1114 LHOB 202-225-2965 Armed Services
Homeland Security
47 Lowenthal, Alan D 515 CHOB 202-225-7924 Foreign Affairs
Natural Resources
48 Rohrabacher, Dana R 2300 RHOB 202-225-2415 Foreign Affairs
Science, Space, and Technology
49 Issa, Darrell R 2347 RHOB 202-225-3906 Oversight and Government
the Judiciary
50 Hunter, Duncan D. R 223 CHOB 202-225-5672 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce
Transportation
51 Vargas, Juan D 1605 LHOB 202-225-8045 Agriculture
Foreign Affairs
House Administration
52 Peters, Scott D 2410 RHOB 202-225-0508 Armed Services
Science, Space, and Technology
53 Davis, Susan D 1526 LHOB 202-225-2040 Armed Services
Education and the Workforce

06-27-14 WSJ: Oyster Farm Digs in for High Court Hearing

Oyster Farm Digs in for High Court Hearing

 

“The oyster farm’s owners, Kevin Lunny and his family, have staved off closure so far by appealing the decision in the federal courts. They are now waiting to learn whether the U.S. Supreme Court will hear their case.

If the answer is yes, it would allow the Lunnys at least a few more months to continue their business, which employs 25 people and produces about a third of California-harvested oysters. The court’s decision on whether to hear the case next fall could be posted on its website Monday.

Amid the uncertainty, Mr. Lunny said he has reduced his staffing from 30 to 25, mostly through attrition. While he remains hopeful of ultimately winning the fight, he said it has taken a toll on him.

“The government is a powerful group to be up against,” said Mr. Lunny, who is being represented by pro bono attorneys. “They have unlimited resources and they just line up the lawyers.”

 

 

Businessman Staves Off Closure as Clock Runs Out on Lease in Wilderness-Designated Area Along California Coast

By Jim Carlton

 

June 27, 2014 7:03 p.m. ET

 

POINT REYES NATIONAL SEASHORE, Calif.—Bill Fischer has been making a trek to buy freshly harvested oysters along the Marin County coast here for 60 years.

“These are some of the best oysters anywhere,” said Mr. Fischer, an 82-year-old retired legal analyst from Lafayette, Calif., who walked away with a bagful after a visit to the Drakes Bay Oyster Co. near Inverness with his wife this week.

But trips here by aficionados like Mr. Fischer may soon come to an end. Former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar in November 2012 ordered Drakes Bay to shut down after its 40-year lease with the National Park Service ended on Nov. 30, 2012.

In so doing, Mr. Salazar cited Congress’s 1976 designation of much of the Point Reyes preserve as wilderness.

The oyster farm’s owners, Kevin Lunny and his family, have staved off closure so far by appealing the decision in the federal courts. They are now waiting to learn whether the U.S. Supreme Court will hear their case.

If the answer is yes, it would allow the Lunnys at least a few more months to continue their business, which employs 25 people and produces about a third of California-harvested oysters. The court’s decision on whether to hear the case next fall could be posted on its website Monday.

“I certainly hope things go your way,” Mr. Fischer, 82, told Mr. Lunny, who is 56-years-old.

Drakes Bay is one of several traditional businesses and activities located on the West’s vast federal lands that have come under pressure to close or reduce operations, often at the behest of environmental groups.

Mining claims have been taken over in Alaska’s Denali National Park and Preserve, while in Yellowstone National Park use of snowmobiles has been greatly restricted.

Ranchers throughout the West have had grazing leases on federal public land restricted or canceled, or ended their own private operations amid increasing regulatory pressures.

“People working and living on landscapes just doesn’t fit in their vision of what a national park should be,” said Laura Watt, associate professor and chair of environmental studies and planning at Sonoma State University, and a supporter of Mr. Lunny.

Interior Department and Justice Department officials wouldn’t comment, citing the pending litigation. But government supporters say Mr. Lunny knew the lease would expire in 2012 when he bought the oyster farm in 2004, but said he believed at the time it could be renewed.

“The government has acted fairly,” said Neal Desai, a director for the National Parks Conservation Association, an environmental nonprofit in San Francisco that supports closing the farm. “It’s only fair the contract is upheld.”

The fate of the oyster farm, which has been in operation on the site since 1934, has divided the area.

“Save Our Drakes Bay Oyster Farm” signs can be spotted throughout the community. Support extends across the San Francisco Bay Area, where Drakes Bay is a major supplier to restaurants such as Burgers & Vine in Sonoma, Calif.

Drakes Bay, which produces about 450,000 pounds of oyster meat annually with revenues of $1.5 million, is the largest of about a half-dozen oyster farms in the West Marin area.

If it closed, there likely would be no shortage of oysters because there are big producers elsewhere, such as in Washington state, to fill the gap. Oysters are also abundant on the global market, which includes Asia.

“It’s a crock, and you can quote me on that,” Carlo Cavallo, who owns Burgers & Vine, said of the ordered closure. “We are talking about a farm that has been there for almost 100 years.”

But some environmentalists and other backers of the closure say the farm, with its boats, buildings and processing activity, isn’t compatible with a wilderness area.

“Wilderness is a place where people can go to renew their spirits,” said Karen Gray, 67, owner of a bed-and-breakfast in nearby Point Reyes Station who supports the closure.

“And it provides for future generations refuge for the spirit,” she said.

The prospect of closure, meanwhile, is having a chilling effect on the farm and its employees. Paco Aceves, a crew supervisor who has worked at the farm for four years, said uncertainty about his employment has put college plans on hold for his oldest son.

“It’s hard to make plans for him,” said the 45-year-old father of three.

Amid the uncertainty, Mr. Lunny said he has reduced his staffing from 30 to 25, mostly through attrition. While he remains hopeful of ultimately winning the fight, he said it has taken a toll on him.

“The government is a powerful group to be up against,” said Mr. Lunny, who is being represented by pro bono attorneys. “They have unlimited resources and they just line up the lawyers.”

 

 

The article’s behind a paywall, but here’s the link:

http://online.wsj.com/articles/oyster-farm-digs-in-for-high-court-hearing-1403910202

 

 

06-27-14 Marin Co Sup Court DBOC WINS OVER CCC, CCC ABUSED DISCRETION & VIOLATED the LAW

“DRAKES BAY OYSTER WAS VINDICATED TODAY

in its fight against unjust enforcement orders imposed last year

BY THE CALIFORNIA COASTAL COMMISSION.

The Marin County Superior Court 

OVERTURNED THOSE ORDERS IN EVERY SIGNIFICANT EFFECT,

finding that the

COMMISSION’S

UNFAIR PROCESS

WAS AN

ABUSE OF DISCRETION

AND A

VIOLATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL LAW.”

 

June 27, 2014  Media Contact: Tina Walker Office: 415.227.9700 Cell: 650.248.1037 Email: tina@singersf.com    

 

Drakes Bay Wins: Court Overturns California Coastal Commission Orders Against Oyster Farm Commission abused its discretion and violated environmental law

INVERNESS, CALIF. — Drakes Bay Oyster was vindicated today in its fight against unjust enforcement orders imposed last year by the California Coastal Commission. The Marin County Superior Court overturned those orders in every significant respect, finding that the Commission’s unfair process was an abuse of discretion and a violation of environmental law.

 

The enforcement orders were based on false allegations for which there was no evidence. Before a hearing last February, expert evidence disproving the allegations was provided by the Lunnys, but the Commission voted to exclude all the evidence the Lunnys presented in their own defense.

 

“This is a good day for California,” said Phyllis Faber, a Marin County environmental activist and biologist who was a founding member of the Commission. “The Coastal Commission had seriously abused its power. It was necessary to hold them accountable.”

 

Now that the Commission’s unfair enforcement orders have been overturned, the oyster farm and the Commission can get back to working on a permit for the farm.

 

Drakes Bay’s lawsuit against the Coastal Commission is separate from its suit against the National Park Service, which is currently pending at the U.S. Supreme Court.  The Supreme Court could decide as soon as Monday whether to take Drakes Bay’s case.

 

About Drakes Bay Oyster Company

The historic oyster farm in Drakes Estero, located in Point Reyes, Marin County, has been part of the community for nearly 100 years. The Lunnys, a fourth-generation Point Reyes ranching family, purchased the oyster farm in 2004. Modern environmentalists and proponents of sustainable agriculture praise Drakes Bay Oyster as a superb example of how people can produce high-quality food in harmony with the environment. The farm produces approximately one third of all oysters grown in California, and employs 30 members of the community. The Lunnys also contribute the oyster shells that make possible the restoration of native oysters in San Francisco Bay and the oyster shells used to create habitat for the endangered Snowy Plover and Least Tern. As the last oyster cannery in California, Drakes Bay is the only local (and thus the only safe and affordable) source of these shells. The Lunny family is proud of its contributions to a sustainable food model that conserves and maintains the productivity of the local landscapes and the health of its inhabitants. For more information, please visit www.drakesbayoyster.comand www.savedrakesbay.com

04-16-14 Marin Superior Court Judge Chernus says “will take it under advisement” at end of hearing

04-16-14 Judge Chernus listened attentively to arguments from both sides, took notes, and at the end of the hearing stated “You’ve given us a lot to think about. I will take it under advisement and get back to you.”

His honor did not specify a date by which he will let us know his decision. Nevertheless, the attorneys are speculating the final ruling may be out within the next three weeks. The ruling could come as early as tomorrow yet on the other hand, it doesn’t have to be out for months from now.

04-15-14 Judge Ruled Ca. Coastal Comm. Violated Environmental Law & Abused its Discretion

04-15-14

Marin Superior Court, Judge Chernus,

issued his temporary ruling today stating the

California Coastal Commission violated environmental law

by not conducting an environmental review, and

abused its discretion by excluding Drakes Bay Oyster Farm evidence.

 

Racks and buildings need not be removed.

Didemnum measures struck down.

Existing Manila clams can stay.

 

To read the ruling, please click on the link below.

tentative 15 apr 2014

This is a tentative ruling.

All parties will appear in Marin County Superior Court, Department B, tomorrow morning, 04-16-14 at 8:30 AM to present arguments.

 

04-14-14 Videos originally aired on Marin TV RE: DBOC, by Peggy Day of “Seriously Now”

Peggy Day, Producer of Seriously Now on Marin TV has posted to Vimeo 8 programs on aired on the DBOC story.

Please click on or copy and paste into your web browser the link below to watch them. You will need to scroll down the page and / or click next to view all the videos posted to the YouTube channel.

http://vimeo.com/channels/723685

03-04-14 REPLY IN SUPPORT OF MOTION FOR PEREMPTORY WRIT OF MANDATE

EXCERPTS FROM THE BRIEF:

 …. the “wholesale disqualification” of a party’s experts violates due process as a matter of law, ….

the exclusion of a “credible and substantial” expert report violates due process

…the Commission violated due process by its wholesale disqualification of Drakes Bay’s expert testimony, which included credible and substantial expert reports. [the commission] never mentions either of the cases, ….

The Commission thereby concedes the issue, and the motion. 

This due-process violation, alone, is enough to invalidate the Orders.

 the Commission violated due process by not allowing for cross-examination, and that the Commission’s decision was not supported by competent evidence. 

The California Coastal Commission responds with a series of small, mostly procedural arguments.  All are wrong.

In the quasi-judicial proceeding at issue, the Commission

  • did not act as an impartial judge
  • was too happy to embrace criticisms of the oyster farm,
  • was too hostile to any evidence that favored the farm,
  • was too quick to dismiss evidence that rebutted the staff report.
  • Its behavior demonstrated a desire to win at any cost, and no respect for the truth.

                             VII.     CONCLUSION

This Court should issue an order declaring the Orders invalid, and issue a writ of mandate.

For the complete brief, click on or copy and paste the link below into your web browser:

03-04-14 Reply Brief ISO DBOC’s Motion for Peremptory Writ of Mandate

01-30-2014 Pt Reyes Light: Miracle Stay Keeps DBOC Afloat

Miracle stay keeps Drakes afloat

By Samantha Kimmey

01/30/2014

Point Reyes Light

 

The fate of Drakes Bay Oyster Company rests in the hands of the justices of the United States Supreme Court.

 

The historic Point Reyes shellfish farm’s owners, employees and supporters might have thought a miracle occurred on Monday, when the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals granted the farm’s plea for a 90-day stay so it might continue selling and canning shellfish while a team of lawyers submits an appeal to the high court.

 

The stay followed two distressing rulings for Drakes Bay from the same circuit court. A 2-1 ruling in September denied the farm an injunction so that it could remain open as it battled the Interior Department and National Park Service over a decision in Nov. 2012 to shutter the farm. (The same three judges this week signed the order for the stay.) A subsequent request for an en banc rehearing was denied earlier this month.

 

Farm owner Kevin Lunny said that despite those recent decisions, he was not surprised by this week’s news. “Nothing surprises me anymore because I don’t know what to expect. It’s all uncharted territory,” he said.

 

Stays are issued if all three of the following conditions are present: there is a reasonable chance that four Supreme Court justices would consider tackling the case, there is a significant possibility that the high court would reverse the lower court’s decision, and if “irreparable harm” would follow the denial of a stay.

 

The government filed a brief in opposition to the stay half an hour before the circuit court granted it. Federal lawyers wrote that not a single judge voted to rehear the case en banc, and argued that the petition to the high court was not likely to succeed because the circuit court’s decision was not a broad holding but a narrow decision about a single permit. Drakes Bay lawyer Peter Prows said the court must not have found those arguments persuasive.

 

Despite significant controversy and evidence that farm operations do not harm harbor seals residing in Drakes Estero, the government’s rebuttal also singled out the pinnipied’s pupping season as “an equitable factor that the court should consider” because of the farm’s motorboats.

 

Mr. Prows said the harbor seal reference riled him. “Here the feds go again saying the farm should be shut down to protect harbor seals from harm that wasn’t occurring. I thought that was kind of outrageous.”

 

Drakes Bay lawyers have until April 14 to submit their appeal.

01-30-2014 Marin Voice: “9th Circuit … Puts a Thumb on the Scale” (of Justice)

Marin Voice: Oyster ruling deserves another look

By Jim Linford
Guest op-ed column

Posted:   01/30/2014 06:11:32 PM PST

THE Ninth Circuit has refused to rehear the oyster farm case with only one judge an Obama appointee and the dissent’s authorvoting to rehear it. The case will now go to the United States Supreme Court who may agree to hear it.

But the Ninth Circuit decision is very odd because, again and again, it puts a thumb on the scale.

First, it needlessly disparages — or at least trivializes — one side in the dispute. The opinion begins:

“This appeal, which pits an oyster farm, oyster lovers and well-known “foodies” against environmentalists aligned with the federal government, has generated considerable attention in the San Francisco Bay Area.”

While the court appears to take judicial notice of the public debate, it apparently does not acknowledge that sustainable agriculture is an environmentalist concern, and, most importantly, that there are environmentalists on both sides of the dispute. The court puts a thumb on the scale.

Second, the court disregards a universal legal maxim, general rules are understood broadly while exceptions, narrowly. In administrative law, the general rule is that courts have jurisdiction to review all governmental action. There are some exceptions to that general rule, but the exceptions should be narrowly applied. However, in the oyster farm case, the court oddly gives a very broad application to an exception — Article 124 — the court thus prevents itself from looking into irregularity in the Secretary of the Interior’s oyster farm decision. The court puts a thumb on the scale.

Third, the court muddles the geography of the oyster farm by failing to distinguish clearly between those parts of the farm that are within the wilderness zone and those parts that, like the farm buildings of the neighboring dairy ranches, are within the pastoral zone.

Only the oyster beds are within the wilderness. But by confuting the pastoral and wilderness zones, the buildings and the beds, the court leaves the impression of far greater impact on the wilderness. The court puts a thumb on the scale.

Fourth, the court treats the legislative intent at the creation of the seashore and the wilderness as something that can be lightly brushed aside by some sort of (in this case, merely tacit) indication of changed intent. However, the initial legislative intent that the agriculturalists — including the oyster farm — would continue to have their use permits renewed was part of the historic bargain between environmentalists and agriculturalists that created the seashore. As anyone who has seen the film “Rebels With a Cause” knows, without that bargain, the lands would have been lost to the urbanization of commercial real estate development. By ignoring the reality of the seashore’s origins, the court puts a thumb on the scale.

Given the historic bargain that preserved the seashore, it is absolutely outrageous to argue that the agriculturalists somehow gave up their traditional use of the land when they were in fact protecting it by transferring ownership to the Park Service.

Sustainable agricultural use has been an inextricable part of the texture of the seashore since its creation.

The Ninth Circuit’s unfair decision ignores that primordial reality and should now be taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Jim Linford of Marinwood is a semi-retired appellate attorney who has filed a pro bono amicus brief in support of the oyster farm on behalf of an historic resource foundation

11-21-13 WMC Goodman Brief Details History of NPS False Science

Goodman Brief Details History of NPS False Science

By Sarah Rolph

Those who have closely followed the Drakes Bay Oyster Company (DBOC) controversy know that local scientist Dr. Corey Goodman became involved in April 2007 when Marin County Supervisor Steve Kinsey contacted Dr. Goodman, based upon his scientific credentials and experience in science and public policy, and asked him to analyze the National Park Service (NPS) science on Drakes Estero.

Kinsey then invited Dr. Goodman to testify as an independent scientist at the May 8, 2007 County hearing as to whether NPS data supported NPS claims. At the time, Dr. Goodman did not know Kevin Lunny, owner of Drakes Bay Oyster Company. Dr. Goodman’s analysis showed that NPS data did not support NPS claims, and he testified that NPS officials misrepresented their own data.

Goodman is passionate on the topic of scientific integrity. At the May 2007 meeting, he stated:

“I believe that public policy decisions can and should be informed by quality science. But this must be science conducted rigorously, without agendas or conflicts-of interest. The political process can be dangerously misled by bad or misused science. One of my greatest concerns when I see science being invoked in public policy debates is to make sure that it is good science and not pseudo-science or — even worse — a blatant misuse of science.”

The history of the DBOC controversy has shown these comments to be prescient. What has happened since 2007 has, sadly, been a blatant misuse of science.

Dr. Goodman’s Amicus brief supporting DBOC’s petition for en banc rehearing in the Ninth Circuit provides an excellent summary of this blatant misuse.

There is no scientific basis for the view—promulgated by the National Park Service (NPS) Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)—that the oyster farm causes significant environmental harm to Drakes Estero.

“To this day,” the brief argues, “NPS and their supporters continue to recite a fictional narrative that they have evidence of environmental harm, when they have no such evidence.”

Goodman’s brief details the shocking history of false NPS claims. As the brief explains:

“The EIS is the latest chapter in a seven-year effort by NPS to claim the oyster farm causes environmental harm. Again and again, NPS issued papers, reports and testimony claiming the oyster farm harms the environment. Each time, NPS had to correct, revise, or retract its claims after being sharply criticized by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Department of the Interior’s Inspector General and Office of the Solicitor, or Congress. But each correction has proven to be a new opportunity for NPS to misrepresent the science on some new issue—be it eelgrass, sediments, fish, harbor seals, soundscape, and, most recently, a tunicate.

In the end, NPS spent millions of dollars searching for adverse environmental impacts that do not exist. It is difficult not to conclude that this pattern was intentional. It certainly was not harmless.”

The NPS EIS even claims that the oyster farm is bad for water quality.

In fact, the opposite is true: oysters, being filter-feeders, provide environmental benefits to the waters in which they live, which is why oyster restoration projects are under way globally. Just last week, on November 15, the San Francisco Chronicle featured on its front page an exciting update about the oyster restoration effort in San Francisco Bay (an effort made possible by the donation of DBOC oyster shells). (In case you missed it, that article is here: http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/2-million-oysters-in-bay-begin-restoration-effort-4984300.php)

The Ninth Circuit majority, having been misled by the NPS EIS, called removal of the oyster farm an “environmental conservation effort.” Unless NPS intends to remove the surrounding cattle ranches (which they publicly promise not to do), the prudent “environmental conservation effort” would be to allow the oysters to continue to filter and clarify the water, not to eliminate the oyster farm.

The false claims in the EIS were so outlandish that Congress expressed concern about “the validity of the science underlying the [Draft EIS]” and directed the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to review it.

The NAS review pointed out that the EIS had it backwards—that the oysters are “beneficial” for the environment:  “… the committee determined that an alternate conclusion on the overall impact of DBOC operations could be reached, with the beneficial effects of shellfish filtration outweighing the adverse impacts from sediment disturbance and the low levels of contaminants generated by DBOC activities.”

The EIS review is not the first time the Academy was asked by Congress to review NPS science. The NAS was also asked to get involved in 2009. They convened a scientific panel, held a series of public meetings, and ultimately released its review on NPS’s claims on May 5, 2009. That NAS panel came to two major conclusions:

  • “[NPS] selectively presented, overinterpreted, or misrepresented the available scientific information on DBOC operations …”
  • “… there is a lack of strong scientific evidence that shellfish farming has major adverse ecological effects on Drakes Estero.”

Nevertheless, the NPS continued to press its false narrative.

The details are incredible. For example, a secret camera program was put in place to monitor oyster workers without their knowledge. Apparently NPS was hoping to find evidence for its claims that oyster boats disturb seals—the three years of data from the secret cameras instead proved the opposite. The Park Service had those photos analyzed by outside experts, and the seal expert who reviewed them found the same result. The Park Service had no other evidence for its claims about seals, so it took the astounding step of changing the report, claiming in the EIS that the review found disturbance to seals—the opposite of what was actually found.

Please read the brief to learn the full story of the Park Service’s malfeasance. You can find it here: http://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/general/2013/10/25/13-15227_Amicus_brief_by_Dr_Corey_Goodman.pdf

The Citizen welcomes your letters and essays on this brief, and on all the briefs profiled in this series. Send your comments to editor@westmarincitizen.com

10-10-13 OpEd: “Judges Agreed, Congress’ intent oyster farm to remain indefinitely”

 

“… it is not well understood that the judges did all agree on a very important fact: When Congress designated the wilderness in the Point Reyes National Seashore in 1976, it thought the oyster farm to be compatible with wilderness and expected the farm to remain indefinitely.”

 

Marin News

     

Marin Voice: Oysters in the wilderness

By Jim Linford
Guest op-ed column

Posted:   10/10/2013 08:00:00 PM PDT

 

 

Jim Linford

THOSE OF US who have followed the Drakes Bay Oyster Co. case understand that the three-judge decision handed down at the beginning of September went against the oyster farm by 2-1.

But it is not well understood that the judges did all agree on a very important fact: When Congress designated the wilderness in the Point Reyes National Seashore in 1976, it thought the oyster farm to be compatible with wilderness and expected the farm to remain indefinitely.

The dissent fully develops this understanding of the original congressional intent, and the majority acknowledges “the accuracy of the dissent’s recitation of the legislative history of the 1976 Act.”

Here is the puzzle: All three judges agreed that Congress intended the oyster farm to be compatible with wilderness. And yet two of them upheld the secretary’s decision to close down the oyster farm based on his misunderstanding that Congress supposedly thought the oyster farm to be incompatible with wilderness.

How could that happen?

First, the majority thought that the secretary’s decision did not have to pay attention to congressional intent because of recent special legislation regarding the Drakes Bay oyster case. And second, since (former) counsel for the oyster farm shared the secretary’s misunderstanding, the oysters-in-the-wilderness approach was never properly presented and did not really need to be considered.

The dissent disagreed and attributed the misunderstanding to the secretary’s legal counsel.

How pristine does wilderness need to be?

In the 2010 Wilderness Watch case, the Ninth Circuit rejected a narrow understanding of the Wilderness Act, one that would preserve the wilderness in a museum diorama, one that we might observe only from a safe distance, behind a brass railing and a thick glass window.

Rather, it is the act’s intent to assure that the wilderness be preserved as wilderness and made accessible to people, “devoted to the public purposes of recreational, scenic, scientific, educational, conservation and historical use.”

Although the Wilderness Act generally precludes commercial activities, it specifically allows for the continuation of animal grazing rights that pre-existed the wilderness designation (and, I would argue, for bivalve as well as bovine grazing).

Given this provision and the continuation of grazing within the Point Reyes National Seashore, it is no surprise that in 1976 Congress expected the oyster farm to remain in operation.

The Drakes Bay oyster farm case was not fully developed when presented to the district court and court of appeals. I hope that the Court of Appeals allows it to develop properly by granting the request for an en banc rehearing.

On a more personal level, a rehearing could also permit the correction of an odd misunderstanding at the beginning of the opinion:

“This appeal … pits an oyster farm, oyster lovers and well-known ‘foodies’ against environmentalists aligned with the federal government.”

If we have learned anything at all from the public debate over this matter, it is that there are “environmentalists” on both sides.

Certainly those of us who support sustainable agriculture (a “conservation use” of the seashore) see it as an environmentalist cause.

It would be helpful for the court to acknowledge that fact.

Jim Linford of Marinwood is a semi-retired appellate attorney and an active member of the California Bar.

 

 

 

10-03-13 Washington Post: NPS FAILED TO FOLLOW ITS OWN POLICIES & PROCEDURES

 

10-03-2013 WASHINGTON POST

Whistleblower in Snyder tree case moves on to a new job, wins settlement with park service

By Miranda S. Spivack, Published: October 3

The federal government has settled whistleblower retaliation complaints from a former C & O Canal chief ranger who said he suffered years of reprisals after revealing that the National Park Service had allowed Washington Redskins owner Daniel M. Snyder to cut down 130 mature trees in a federally protected area.

The settlement with Robert M. Danno comes after he complained to the Interior Department’s inspector general and to other officials about the tree-cutting arrangement, and then experienced what he says were eight years of reprisals. The Park Service, he said, removed him from his position as chief ranger for the C & O Canal park; stripped him of the authority to carry a gun; accused him of theft, leading to criminal charges (he was acquitted); reassigned him to issue picnic permits in a park in Northern Virginia with four picnic tables; and for the past three years, threatened him with termination.

Government officials confirmed the existence of the settlement after an inquiry from The Washington Post but said they were barred by the agreement from discussing the terms.

A spokeswoman for the Park Service declined to comment other than to point to a written statement noting that an agreement had been reached and that Danno has a new job with the agency.

Danno also said he could not comment on the agreement.

In a brief interview, he said, “I hope that my experience helps the National Park Service get back on course.”

Jeff Ruch, executive director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), who aided Danno and his attorney, Peter Noone, said the reprisals against the decorated 30-year ranger were the “most vicious” he has seen.

“We have seen all the types of retaliation he experienced,” Ruch said. “We just have not seen it all in one case.”

PEER also represented U.S. Park Police Chief Teresa Chambers in her seven-year fight to win back her job. Chambers was fired in 2003 after she spoke with a Washington Post reporter about budget cuts and staffing reductions.

The settlement with Danno, 54, comes after the federal Office of Special Counsel spent seven months mediating the complaints. As part of the settlement, Danno soon will report to work as a division chief for wilderness planning at the Park Service’s wilderness training center in Missoula, Mont. Danno, who lives in West Virginia, has been working for the past three years as a boundary manager at Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland while under threat of termination.

Danno, who detailed his experiences in a self-published book, wrote that his problems began in 2005 after he advised his boss, C & O Canal park Superintendent Kevin Brandt, to reject a request from Snyder to cut trees in an area where tree-cutting and brush removal are generally prohibited by federal law.

The prohibitions extend to private property abutting the park, such as the Snyder estate in Potomac, to ensure that scenic vistas are maintained and natural resources are protected.

Interior’s inspector general found in a 2006 report that the Park Service violated its own policies when it allowed Snyder to clear 50,000 square feet of mature trees and replace them with saplings. The report did not find any misconduct by Snyder.

Despite the findings, the Park Service continued to marginalize Danno, he says in his book, and eventually threatened to fire him.

The inspector general’s report said that the tree-cutting plan was approved at the highest levels of the agency and that the office of then-Park Service Director Fran Mainella had given Snyder a green light to cut the trees. The report said that the approval disregarded federal environmental laws, harmed the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park and left the agency vulnerable to charges of favoritism.

The inspector general said that P. Daniel Smith, then special assistant to Mainella, pressured lower-level officials to approve the deal.

Mainella and Smith, the report said, gave federal investigators contradictory accounts about how the decision to allow the tree-cutting was reached and about discussions at a Redskins game that Mainella attended as Snyder’s guest.

The inspector general’s report said that Brandt gave investigators contradictory statements about his conversations with the Park Service director’s office. This left unclear whether he had received direction from that office or had acted on his own.

“Our investigation determined that NPS failed to follow any of its established policies and procedures . . . and even disregarded the recommendations of their own Horticulture and Advisory Review Committee,” the inspector general’s report said. The report also said that Snyder had previously offered to pay the Park Service $25,000 “as mitigation for scenic easement variance requests.”

Smith said in a 2006 Washington Post interview that he had received a letter of reprimand for “overstepping his discretion” but did “nothing tawdry.”

He also said investigators in their report misconstrued his statements about Mainella’s role. He said Mainella “was not involved about the trees.”

Mainella had declined comment at the time of the Post article, but her office released a statement saying that there would be no comment about Smith because it was a personnel matter.

Mainella is no longer with the Park Service. Smith is superintendent of Colonial National Historic Park in Yorktown, Va. Brandt is superintendent of the C & O Canal National Historical Park.

The inspector general’s report did not accuse Snyder of doing anything improper but suggested that he had access to top Park Service officials that other residents might not have. Montgomery County, which also had jurisdiction, later penalized Snyder for the tree cutting, requiring him to pay $37,000 and replant.

© The Washington Post Company

 

 

For Immediate Release: Oct 04, 2013
Contact: Kirsten Stade (202) 265-7337

REDSKIN OWNER TREE-CUTTING WHISTLEBLOWER CASE RESOLVED

Special Counsel Mediation Brings Happy Ending for Park Service Ranger Danno

Posted on Oct 04, 2013  | Tags: NPS, District of Columbia


Washington, DC — The long ordeal of Chief Ranger Robert Danno, who blew the whistle on illegal tree cutting by Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder, is over, as indicated in the following joint statement:

“Ranger Danno and the National Park Service resolved his complaint filed under the Whistleblower Protection Act through the Office of Special Counsel’s Alternative Dispute Resolution Program to the mutual satisfaction and the best interest of both parties. While the terms of the settlement are confidential, Ranger Danno has begun a new assignment at the Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center in Missoula, Montana.”

Although we may not say more, Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) could not be more pleased at the outcome and are proud to have been of assistance.

###

Find out more about the Danno saga 

 

 

10-03-13 PRL Letter to Ed: THE EAC HAS BECOME UNRECOGNIZABLE

 Letters

 

The EAC has become unrecognizable

 

Dear Editor,

 

The Environmental Action Committee in recent years has morphed into to an organization unrecognizable from when I was a member, beginning in the late 70’s. At that time we worked hand in hand with the ranching community and I have fond memories of the partnership  to steward the land that was struck between our local farmers and us new arrivals from a more urban background.

 

We often had very different political views, but we treated each other for the most part with respect and politeness. After all, the ranching community was here before we were; most importantly, they were active partners in establishing the park and were a major contributor to the unique character of the West Marin we moved to.

 

The park would not have come into existence without the support of the ranchers when it was just a dream. It is outrageous for the EAC, led by Ms. Trainer, to turn around and bite the hand that feeds us all. What’s next? No renewal of dairy ranch leases?

 

 

Hobart Wright

Inverness Park

09-26-13 WMC Guest Column DBOC CORE of Sustainable Food, Champion Health/Diversity Estero

When I first learned about this conflict, I expected to be on the side of the Park Service. After learning more about the facts of the situation, I’m not. Despite my emotional attraction to the idea of “protecting” this beautiful area, I believe the Park Service has become locked into an outdated and overly rigid notion of wilderness. Worse still, in pursuit of its goals the agency has become a political bully and intentional purveyor of junk science, distorting regulatory requirements and ignoring the ongoing value of the oyster farm  to both the estero and the community. DBOC, in contrast, has emerged as a core player in the Bay Area sustainable food movement, and a champion of the diversity and health of the estero.

 

Guest column

Environmental Stewardship at Drakes Bay

 

By Sandor Schoichet

 

Growing up hiking and camping as a Boy Scout, I had the ethic of leaving campsites cleaner than you found them instilled in me at an early age. Attending college in the early 1970’s among the misty redwoods of UC Santa Cruz inspired my love of natural environments. Now I’ve become an a vid sailor, enjoying the San Francisco Bay and supporting conservation and restoration groups like BayKeepers.  I respond immediately and emotionally to calls for wilderness protection.

 

But I’m also a student of environmental thinkers like Stuart Brand, Bill McKibben, and Emma Marris, who from quite distinct perspectives all advocate a more active and nuanced engagement in environmental stewardship. I appreciate the chaos, change, interdependence, and serendipity behind the multi-layered beauty of nature, which includes us too.  The conventional preservationist strategy, trying to “save” small patches of “pristine wilderness” by putting fences around them, just isn’t always appropriate.

 

Nowhere is this clearer than in the long-running battle by the Park Service and its supporters to shut down Drakes Bay Oyster Company (DBOC) and return the estero to its “natural” state. Their vision of an estero frozen in time seems badly misguided, given that it’s surrounded by working cattle ranches, which the Park Service supports, and given that the National Seashore will continue to provide access for millions of visitors each year.

 

DBOC and its supporters point out that the original purpose of the 1970 Environmental Policy Act, under which the National Seashore was created, was “to create and maintain conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony.”  They argue for the appropriateness of a working landscape in which the filterfeeding  oysters have an active role maintaining  the environmental quality of the estero.

 

When I first learned about this conflict, I expected to be on the side of the Park Service. After learning more about the facts of the situation, I’m not. Despite my emotional attraction to the idea of “protecting” this beautiful area, I believe the Park Service has become locked into an outdated and overly rigid notion of wilderness. Worse still, in pursuit of its goals the agency has become a political bully and intentional purveyor of junk science, distorting regulatory requirements and ignoring the ongoing value of the oyster farm  to both the estero and the community. DBOC, in contrast, has emerged as a core player in the Bay Area sustainable food movement, and a champion of the diversity and health of the estero.

 

The Ninth Circuit ruled against DBOC on September 3. The Lunnys will appeal, citing the split decision. In a blistering dissent, Judge Watford wrote “all indications are that Congress viewed the oyster farm as a beneficial, pre-existing use, whose continuation was fully compatible with wilderness status.”

 

The visionaries who created Point Reyes Seashore realized that humans are part of our ever-changing world, and that we have an unavoidable responsibility to be effective stewards of the ecosystems we care about. Let’s hope the appeal is successful and the vision is upheld.

 

Sandor Schoichet is a management consultant working with biopharma and sustainability clients. He lives in San Rafael.

 

09-30-13 Natl Parks Traveller: POINT REYES has a BUMPER CROP OF SEALS!

Point Reyes National Seashore has had a bumper crop of seals this year.

Seal Production At Point Reyes

While the National Park Service has in the past claimed that the operations of an oyster farm at Point Reyes National Seashore were impacting harbor seals that use Drakes Estero, recent seal production numbers from the estero seem to indicate those impacts have been very, very good.

“The 2013 harbor seal monitoring season has now ended and it was a great year for the seals. During the pupping season, we recorded approximately 1,400 pups, which is one of the highest counts for Point Reyes,” the San Francisco Bay Area National Parks Science and Learning staff noted in their Harbor Seal Monitoring Update for August. “…Drakes Estero had the highest count with 1,122 seals, followed closely by Double Point with 1,012 seals.”

Perhaps because the Park Service is in the middle of a legal battle with Drakes Bay Oyster Co. over the company’s use of Drakes Estero for farming oysters, a disclaimer to that report stresses that “(T)hese data and related graphics are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such.”

 

Around The Parks: Wine Sales, Park Fees, Point Reyes Seals

Submitted by Kurt Repanshek on September 30, 2013 – 1:35am

 

A glance around the National Park System seems to show wine sales can benefit the parks, more and more user fees are being approved despite a five-year-old “moratorium” against them, and Point Reyes National Seashore has had a bumper crop of seals this year.

Wining in the Parks

We recently told you about the waiver National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis OKed for the National Park Foundation to work with the Adler Fells Winery to produce some national park-branded wines.

Well, whether you approve of the Park Service working with distillers to promote the parks or not, this agreement seems to be generating a nice tidy sum of money for the National Park Foundation. Through the first three months of the campaign, the Foundation has taken in about $25,000. Extrapolate that to four quarters, and you’ve got about $100,000 for the Foundation to invest back into the National Park System.

More And More Fee Increases

Some parks, however, are in such financial binds that they are seeking waivers to a five-year-old moratorium on higher user fees in the parks. Former Park Service Director Mary Bomar instituted the ban back in 2008 when the economy was really sour.

Since then, however, parks have felt the need to seek higher user fees to keep various programs running. At Great Smoky Mountains National Park there’s been a highly controversial move to require backcountry travelers to pay $4 per night, up to $20, for their treks.

More recently, Timpanogos Cave National Monument in Utah announced intentions to seek higher fees for cave tours, as is Wind Cave National Park, Pinnacles National Park in California wants to double its entrance fee, to $10, to expand its shuttle bus operations, and Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota has instituted a reservation and fee system for its backcountry campsites.

According to managers in the Park Service’s Recreation Fee Program, between 2008 and 2013 “38 parks increased expanded amenity fees and 10 parks increased entrance fees.”

Looking ahead to next year, 21 more units of the park system have gained the green light to at least discuss proposed fee increases with their stakeholders.

“Once civic engagement activities are completed the parks will forward the results and requests to the regional director,” Jane Anderson, the program’s deputy fee manager, said in an email. “If the regional director concurs those requests will be forwarded to the Washington Office for final approval by the (Park Service) Director.”

One possible justification for higher fees, she said, is that park user fees for such things as campgrounds and boat launches “undercut or compete negatively with local businesses.”

Seal Production At Point Reyes

While the National Park Service has in the past claimed that the operations of an oyster farm at Point Reyes National Seashore were impacting harbor seals that use Drakes Estero, recent seal production numbers from the estero seem to indicate those impacts have been very, very good.

“The 2013 harbor seal monitoring season has now ended and it was a great year for the seals. During the pupping season, we recorded approximately 1,400 pups, which is one of the highest counts for Point Reyes,” the San Francisco Bay Area National Parks Science and Learning staff noted in their Harbor Seal Monitoring Update for August. “…Drakes Estero had the highest count with 1,122 seals, followed closely by Double Point with 1,012 seals.”

Perhaps because the Park Service is in the middle of a legal battle with Drakes Bay Oyster Co. over the company’s use of Drakes Estero for farming oysters, a disclaimer to that report stresses that “(T)hese data and related graphics are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such.”

09-26-13 PRL Letter to Editor EAC must…find new…Executive Director, Trainer mocks EAC goals

From my reading of the Environmental Action Committee’s mission statement, posted on their website, the conduct of Executive Director Amy Trainer toward the Lunny family and Drakes Bay Oyster Company is clearly in conflict with the goals and objectives of the organization.

 

Ms. Trainer’s take-no-prisoners approach to problem solving in this long-standing debate has made an absolute mockery of these goals. Even now that the fate of DBOC is squarely in the hands of courts, her attempt to smear the Lunnys is stark evidence of how she has allowed her role to degenerate, without apology, into a personal vendetta.

 

If this is the kind of reprehensible conduct the EAC is proud to support, then the gaping wounds that have been opened in the hearts and minds of so many people in this community and beyond will only continue to fester. If it is not, then the EAC must take quick and decisive action to find new leadership for its executive position.

 

Point Reyes Light 09-26-13

Trainer mocks EAC goals

Dear Editor,

From my reading of the Environmental Action Committee’s mission statement, posted on their website, the conduct of Executive Director Amy Trainer toward the Lunny family and Drakes Bay Oyster Company is clearly in conflict with the goals and objectives of the organization.

Here are some examples: “EAC works for… the preservation of a rural, community spirit. EAC uses law, policy, science and education to: create a common ground of understanding and promote informed debate  and encourage and facilitate productive resolutions to land-use conflicts by working closely with those who own, manage and use West Marin lands.” Ms. Trainer’s take-no-prisoners approach to problem solving in this long-standing debate has made an absolute mockery of these goals. Even now that the fate of DBOC is squarely in the hands of courts, her attempt to smear the Lunnys is stark evidence of how she has allowed her role to degenerate, without apology, into a personal vendetta.

If this is the kind of reprehensible conduct the EAC is proud to support, then the gaping wounds that have been opened in the hearts and minds of so many people in this community and beyond will only continue to fester. If it is not, then the EAC must take quick and decisive action to find new leadership for its executive position.

Having gone all-in with Ms. Trainer in its wilderness-at-any-cost campaign, the EAC does not have an enviable task before it. This will be especially difficult in a small organization in which everyone knows each other; the bonds of association and friendship can cause a board of directors to put off making such a crucial but necessary decision. Even so, the longer they wait, the worse it will get for them and the greater community they are obliged to serve.

If the EAC has any hope of reclaiming its birthright as an organization dedicated to truth, scientific integrity and personal accountability in the pursuit of the goals and objectives as proclaimed by its founders, there is only one choice they can make.  And only when they find the courage to do  so can any real healing begin.

Bruce Mitchell

Inverness

09-26-13 PRL Letter to Editor: EAC must…find new…Executive Director, Trainer mocks EAC goals

CORRECTION: THIS LETTER IS FROM THE POINT REYES LIGHT, NOT THE WEST MARIN CITIZEN

 

From my reading of the Environmental Action Committee’s mission statement, posted on their website, the conduct of Executive Director Amy Trainer toward the Lunny family and Drakes Bay Oyster Company is clearly in conflict with the goals and objectives of the organization.

 

Ms. Trainer’s take-no-prisoners approach to problem solving in this long-standing debate has made an absolute mockery of these goals. Even now that the fate of DBOC is squarely in the hands of courts, her attempt to smear the Lunnys is stark evidence of how she has allowed her role to degenerate, without apology, into a personal vendetta.

 

If this is the kind of reprehensible conduct the EAC is proud to support, then the gaping wounds that have been opened in the hearts and minds of so many people in this community and beyond will only continue to fester. If it is not, then the EAC must take quick and decisive action to find new leadership for its executive position.

Trainer mocks EAC goals

Dear Editor,

From my reading of the Environmental Action Committee’s mission statement, posted on their website, the conduct of Executive Director Amy Trainer toward the Lunny family and Drakes Bay Oyster Company is clearly in conflict with the goals and objectives of the organization.

Here are some examples: “EAC works for… the preservation of a rural, community spirit. EAC uses law, policy, science and education to: create a common ground of understanding and promote informed debate  and encourage and facilitate productive resolutions to land-use conflicts by working closely with those who own, manage and use West Marin lands.” Ms. Trainer’s take-no-prisoners approach to problem solving in this long-standing debate has made an absolute mockery of these goals. Even now that the fate of DBOC is squarely in the hands of courts, her attempt to smear the Lunnys is stark evidence of how she has allowed her role to degenerate, without apology, into a personal vendetta.

If this is the kind of reprehensible conduct the EAC is proud to support, then the gaping wounds that have been opened in the hearts and minds of so many people in this community and beyond will only continue to fester. If it is not, then the EAC must take quick and decisive action to find new leadership for its executive position.

Having gone all-in with Ms. Trainer in its wilderness-at-any-cost campaign, the EAC does not have an enviable task before it. This will be especially difficult in a small organization in which everyone knows each other; the bonds of association and friendship can cause a board of directors to put off making such a crucial but necessary decision. Even so, the longer they wait, the worse it will get for them and the greater community they are obliged to serve.

If the EAC has any hope of reclaiming its birthright as an organization dedicated to truth, scientific integrity and personal accountability in the pursuit of the goals and objectives as proclaimed by its founders, there is only one choice they can make.  And only when they find the courage to do  so can any real healing begin.

Bruce Mitchell

Inverness

09-19-13: WMC: DUPLICITY – NPS gives no warranty … as to accuracy, reliability, completeness of data”

 

What a ray of sunshine the new NPS seal-count data provides. The latest report tells us that 2013 has been a great year for seals, with one of the highest counts ever for seal pups, and more seals in Drakes Estero than anywhere else in Point Reyes. That should alleviate the fears of anyone who might have gotten the impression that seals could be in danger from Drakes Bay Oyster Company.

 

…the Park Service’s seal-count report includes a disclaimer, saying that the data and related graphics “are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such” and “The National Park Service gives no warranty, expressed or  implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of these data.” 

 

This disclaimer isn’t found on any previous science reports from the Park Service at Point Reyes.

 

 

 

 

Guest Column

Duplicity

 

By Sarah Rolph

 

What a ray of sunshine the new NPS seal-count data provides. The latest report tells us that 2013 has been a great year for seals, with one of the highest counts ever for seal pups, and more seals in Drakes Estero than anywhere else in Point Reyes. That should alleviate the fears of anyone who might have gotten the impression that seals could be in danger from Drakes Bay Oyster Company.

 

I was fascinated to see that the Park Service’s seal-count report includes a disclaimer, saying that the data and related graphics “are not legal documents and are not intended to be used as such” and “The National Park Service gives no warranty, expressed or  implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of these data.”

 

This disclaimer isn’t found on any previous science reports from the Park Service at Point Reyes. I find it ironic that they would offer it now, given the clear deficiencies of many of their scientific efforts.

 

For example, the one paper the Park Service clings to as purported evidence claims that the oyster farm disturbs seals. The paper by Park Service scientist Ben Becker doesn’t even claim to find anything more than a correlation.

 

If there’s one thing most of us learn about science, it’s that correlation does not imply causation. Seems like the Park Service ought to have put a disclaimer on the Becker paper.

 

They should probably put a disclaimer on the Park Service’s Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), too, since its claims about oyster-farm disturbance to seals are based largely on Becker. The EIS downplays that, pretending it has been sources by saying “the impact analysis in the EIS places emphasis on the data review, analysis, and interpretation of scientists in NAS (2009) and MMC (2011b).”

 

NAS (2009)? Isn’t that the report by the National Academy of Sciences that found fault with the Park Service data? Indeed it is. Checking the EIS to see what data review, analysis, or interpretation they included from that NAS review, I found exactly one sentence, and it’s very misleading: “Factors influencing the behavior of harbor seals within Drakes Estero have been reviewed by NAS (2009).”

 

NAS did indeed review those factors.  Here’s what they found:

 

“NPS selectively presents harbor seal survey data in Drakes Estero and over-interprets the disturbance data which are incomplete and non-representative of the full spectrum of disturbance activities in the Estero.” And: “…research that has been conducted within Drakes Estero cannot be used either to directly demonstrate any effects of the oyster farm on harbor seals or to demonstrate the absence of potential effects.”

 

So given that the Becker paper casts no light on the situation, and that NAS (2009) simply points out the scientific errors of the NPS, on what basis could the EIS possibly have found “long-term moderate adverse impacts on harbor seals due to the continuation of commercial shellfish operations”?

 

The only other thing cited in the EIS is the MMC report. Does it contain the evidence?

 

Seven independent seal scientists conducted the scientific analysis for the MMC study. One can read their full verbatim reports in Appendix F of the report.

 

It’s eye opening to do so, none of the scientists found the Becker paper convincing. Instead they point out that the design of the Becker study is entirely inappropriate for the issues it attempts to explore, and that everything that is known about harbor seals suggests that the concerns expressed by NPS about mariculture disturbing seals in Drakes Estero are unfounded. (Somehow, the executive summary of the MMC report manages to suggest otherwise, though just barely. It also suggests the Park Service continue funding MMC studies of the issue.)

 

The scientists on both the Academy panel and the MMC panel pointed out that the best way to learn whether the oyster farm operations disturbed seals would be with time-and-date-stamped photographs.  It must have been a shock to later learn that the Park Service had been capturing exactly that data since May of 2007, but chose not to disclose it.

 

It certainly bothered Brian Kingzett. Kingzett is Deep Bay Marine Field Station Manager at the Center for Shellfish Research, Vancouver Island University, and one of the seven scientists who served on the MMC panel. Kingzett reports, “The panel even suggested to the Parks Staff while on site above the Estero how easy it would be to put wildlife cameras on the Estero to resolve some of the questions. Staff looked at us and agreed that maybe it was an option worth considering. And they had cameras up the whole time. We then spent the rest of the week discussing the lack of any good data.”

 

NPS has falsified the record to further its own agenda. The duplicity extends further:  Interior is talking out of both sides of its mouth, claiming Secretary Salazar’s decision against the oyster farm was not based on the fraudulent EIS. And NPS is using that same EIS to argue in court against the oyster farm.

 

If left unchecked, this out-of-control Federal agency will destroy the livelihoods of dozens of people and eliminate a popular, historic, successful, and benign oyster farm.

 

And it will damage the California economy. The EIS itself clearly states that eliminating the oyster farm “could result in long-term, major, adverse impacts on California’s shellfish market.”  That is a feature of the Park Service’s “preferred alternative.”

 

The scientific credibility of the Park Service at Point Reyes is in shreds. No disclaimer can save it.

 

 

 

HERE IS THE NPS DISCLAIMER FROM THEIR HARBOR SEAL MONITORING UPDATE(S) 2013 AT http://www.sfnps.org/download_product/4301/0

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09-12-13 West Marin Citizen: DBOC case may rise to Supreme Court

As reprinted in today’s West Marin Citizen:

DBOC case may rise to Supreme Court
Transcribed and edited by Peggy Day

Last Monday afternoon the Farm and Foodshed Report, the KWMR radio program, provided some straight answers to very complicated questions about the Drakes Bay Oyster Company’s federal legal case. During the show, host Robin Carpenter interviewed DBOC attorney Peter S. Prows of Briscoe, Ivester and Bazel about the decision to request another hearing at the Ninth Circuit Court. Mr. Prows, who is experienced with the California Environmental Quality Act and Endangered Species Act, among other qualifications, explained why he believes that the oyster company may prevail in federal court.

Robin Carpenter:We invited representatives of the National Park Service and Department of the Interior to speak but unfortunately, the United States Government and Department of Justice do not speak about ongoing legal actions. Peter, can you give us an overview of the situation?

Peter Prows: By a two-to-one margin, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a decision affirming the District Court’s denial of a preliminary injunction to the oyster company. Judge Margaret McKeown, in agreement with a visiting judge from Ohio, wrote the majority opinion that the court essentially lacked jurisdiction to review the reasons given in an agency’s decision on a permit like this.

Carpenter: This is just one piece of the legal puzzle. The oyster company has asked for an injunction to stay in operation until the complete legal proceedings play out, correct?

Prows: It’s an important piece because, if the farm is forced to shut down while the lawsuit proceeds, that’s going to cause some real damage to the business, even if we’re ultimately successful. Legally it’s also important because to get a preliminary injunction, one of the things you have to show is that you are likely to prevail on the merits of the case. The majority didn’t think we were able to show that but Judge Paul Watford wrote the dissent and he was very strong. He thought we were likely to prevail on the merits of the case and former Secretary Salazar’s decision was “arbitrary and capricious.”
Carpenter: It’s not often that you see a dissent that’s so extremely strong.

Prows: It’s one of the strongest dissenting opinions I’ve ever read. What’s really remarkable is, going back to 2004, after the Lunnys spent a couple hundred thousand dollars to invest and fix up the oyster farm, they got a letter and a memo from the Park Service saying that the wilderness laws, in particular the 1976 Point Reyes Wilderness Act, mandated that the Park Service not issue a new permit to the oyster farm when the existing permit expired in November of 2012. This is a legal position that the Park Service has now taken over the last 8 to 10 years. It always struck the Lunnys as strange. They thought the Point Reyes National Seashore was set up to promote and preserve agriculture and aquaculture in West Marin, not to destroy it.

What’s remarkable about the dissent is that Judge Watford actually agrees with the Oyster company about the interpretation of the wilderness legislation for Point Reyes. He wrote: “All indications are that Congress viewed the oyster farm as a beneficial preexisting use whose continuation was fully compatible with wilderness status.” And, the most remarkable thing about this whole opinion is that the majority, the two judges who voted against the oyster farm, never actually disagreed with the dissent on the interpretation of the wilderness legislation. So, there’s really no question anymore that the Park Service has had the law wrong all along.

Carpenter: I was surprised that the majority was very vague. Watford’s interpretation agreed with what Bill Bagley and others who were there said.

Prows: That’s exactly right. Quite frankly, for 30 years before the Park Service’s memo to the Lunnys, that’s what everybody thought that legislation meant. The Department of Interior told Congress in the 1970’s that the oyster farm was a beneficial use there and should continue notwithstanding whatever wilderness legislation was passed. The Environmental Action Committee of West Marin told Congress essentially the same thing. The Wilderness Society and the Sierra Club had the same view. Everybody had the same view of what the law should accomplish and what the law meant. It wasn’t until 30 years later that the Park Service and some of these groups changed positions. Judge Watford called that a “bizarre” change of position.

We are planning to file for a rehearing. So, this case is not over.

Carpenter: What is happening, is that you guys are going a step above to the Ninth Circuit to say, we think the District Court wasn’t correct.

Prows: That’s right. There’s no longer any dispute that the Park Service has been misinterpreting the law for the last 10 years. As Watford says, “you can’t really argue otherwise with a straight face when you actually look at legislative history.” What the Park Service has put the Lunnys through for the last ten years is really a struggle against the Park Service’s misinterpretation of the law. So the question we are going to be presenting to the full en banc court is whether courts should stand aside even when they know agencies have the law wrong, even when an agency makes a decision based upon a fundamental misinterpretation of the law. Whether the courts have jurisdiction to step in or not. I think that’s a pretty important question.

Carpenter: People say, it’s very difficult to appeal with a governmental or administrative decision and Salazar’s decision is an administrative decision.

Prows: There’s what’s called the Administrative Procedures Act which requires agencies to make decisions in generally a rational way and prohibits agencies from making decisions that are quote “arbitrary, capricious, and an abuse of discretion or are otherwise not in accordance with the law.” That usually should, at least in my view, prohibit an agency from denying you a permit for a reason that’s kind of absurd or just plain wrong in the law. When an agency tells you that it can’t give you a permit because the law and congress’s intent behind that law was that you shouldn’t get your permit, there’s a fundamental misunderstanding of the law and of your decision-making authority. If you read what Secretary Salazar wrote, he makes it very clear that he was trying to effectuate what he thought congressional intent was, what he thought the law meant. He thought the oyster farm had to go and that was wrong.

Carpenter: Is there another step beyond the en banc review?

Prows: If we don’t get the injunction from the en banc panel, we could petition for a Writ of Certiorari from the U.S. Supreme Court asking it to decide to take the case for review. We have issues that could very well interest the Supreme Court.

08-25-13 Marin Voice: Up-to-date Eco Theory by Dr. J. Creque

Yet efforts now underway to restore oysters to San Francisco Bay, and estuaries around the world, offer pertinent examples of how shellfish, as ecosystem engineers, can improve water quality, add to structural diversity in the estuarine system, and play a critical role in enhancing ecosystem biodiversity, productivity, and resilience.

 

Aldo Leopold once argued that the first rule of intelligent tinkering was to save all the pieces. Saving the Drakes Bay Oyster Co. is one simple, sane step in that direction.

 

 

Marin News

 

Marin Voice: Up-to-date ecological theory

By Jeff Creque
Guest op-ed column

Posted:   08/25/2013 06:00:00 PM PDT

IN HIS July 31 Marin Voice column in favor of elimination of the Drakes Bay oyster farm, Joe Mueller nicely articulates the fundamental misunderstanding of ecosystem dynamics underlying his argument.

With all due respect for the linear dynamics assumed and espoused by Mr. Mueller (after all, most of us who received our early ecological training in the ’60s and ’70s were taught within that framework), that view of ecosystem dynamics is both outdated and, quite frankly, wrong.

Mueller evokes closed system dynamics to support his argument that carbon and nutrients are limited, and limiting, within the estero. But modern ecosystem theory recognizes entirely different dynamics in open systems, of which Drakes Estero is an archetypical example.

Indeed, open to inputs from both sky and sea, the estero, rather than being limited by a fixed quantity of energy and nutrients, has essentially an unlimited capacity for self-organized complexity, including enormous biomass production and biodiversity potential.

That same misunderstanding of ecosystem dynamics underlies the 19th-century “human-free wilderness” convictions of those opposing Drakes Bay Oyster Co.’s longstanding lease on the premise of “protecting pristine wilderness.”

Under that archaic paradigm, any human involvement with the imagined “wild” is necessarily negative.

It is impossible, within that outmoded framework, to conceive of ecosystem complexity and productivity increasing under enlightened management.

Yet efforts now underway to restore oysters to San Francisco Bay, and estuaries around the world, offer pertinent examples of how shellfish, as ecosystem engineers, can improve water quality, add to structural diversity in the estuarine system, and play a critical role in enhancing ecosystem biodiversity, productivity, and resilience.

No one is arguing against protecting the ecology of Drakes Estero. But the estero does not, contrary to Mueller’s argument, exist in isolation.

Titular designation as “wilderness” will not “protect” it from rising sea levels, acidifying ocean waters, climate destabilization or the broader global catastrophe unfolding around us.

With over seven billion (and counting) human mouths to be fed, the oyster farm, by offering a truly sustainable alternative to non-sustainable sources of marine protein, is an essential part of the solution to the over-exploitation of global resources that Mueller so properly laments.

Once upon a time, the heroics of wilderness protectionism served to bring awareness of the fundamental importance of the environment to a culture divorced from the dynamics of life on our small planet.

It drove the formation of the National Park System and helped stay the avarice and ignorance of human chauvinism.

But in the end, it is not enough. In fact, it is lousy ecology and cannot serve necessity in a time of unprecedented global change.

If Mueller and others opposing sustainable shellfish aquaculture in Drakes Estero would make the effort to understand the complex, self-organizing dynamics of this living, open system — and, indeed, of the Earth herself — we could begin to move beyond the dangerously constrained limits of the current debate toward the realization of a truly dynamic, productive and sustainable future for our community and our beleaguered planet.

Aldo Leopold once argued that the first rule of intelligent tinkering was to save all the pieces. Saving the Drakes Bay Oyster Co. is one simple, sane step in that direction.

Jeff Creque of Petaluma is a specialist in agroecology and for many years worked on a ranch at Point Reyes National Seashore.

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Updated: August 25, 2013

 

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